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RECYCLING Raise revenue by


Recycling schemes are an easy way to combine waste reduction with fundraising, says Heather Park


schemes. Children can quickly grow out of clothes, so you would be helping parents put these to good use, as well as raising funds that could be ploughed back into


their school. I


f you hate the idea of creating a legacy of landfill for future generations, then why not make recycling part of your income


generation strategy? There are a range of schemes to choose from. You could even run several concurrently to increase revenue. Most programmes provide free media resources to help publicise the launch of your school recycling initiative. All you need to do is site a collection box in a visible and accessible location, promote your scheme regularly and send off your recycling once you have enough.


Textiles Approximately 350,000 tonnes of used, but still wearable, clothing is sent off to landfill in the UK every year, equating to more than 30% of our unwanted clothes. Schools can create fantastic opportunities to help reduce this figure by hosting textile recycling


36 SPRING 2020 FundEd In addition to clothes, other


textiles and products such as curtains, bedding, shoes, bags and soft toys can all be recycled. The textile recycling company Rags 2 Riches (rags2riches4schools.co.uk) operates across the UK and offers free collection bags for you to send home to parents. The company will pick up items and weigh them at the school, with an aim to pay within a week. Payment rates vary according to market fluctuations, but Rags 2 Riches typically gives 50p per kilo and £500 per tonne.


Printer cartridges Ink cartridges take 1,000 years to decompose in landfill. Yet more than 40 million inkjet cartridges are dumped each year in the UK, with 1.1 billion thrown away worldwide. Industry analysts estimate that a spent cartridge can be reused or remanufactured up to seven times, creating less landfill and using less


energy and fewer resources to make new cartridges. The recycling company Empties Please (emptiesplease.com/schools) is keen to both encourage younger generations to be green and help schools raise funds. It will collect used cartridges from your school and donate the money straight back, paying around £1 for every ink cartridge successfully recycled. ‘Green points’ are also awarded for every £1 raised. These can be saved and redeemed against eco goodies such as bulbs, trees and wildlife houses. For maximum impact, don’t stop at the cartridges used by parents and in school. Increase profits further by appealing to nearby businesses for their used cartridges, or by asking them to host a collection box. More than 1,500 schools have signed up to Empties Please, which posts regular updates and bulletins for collectors. For instance, in just one month last year, participating schools raised £2,428.20, and 49 new schools joined its scheme.


Media and electronics Companies such as Music Magpie (musicmagpie.


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