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Cover story


up your school


I


f working in education means you care about young people, then helping to create a better environment for future generations


should be high on your agenda. Yet when schools are cash-strapped and staff face burgeoning workloads, taking the environmental initiative is often seen as a luxury. However, even a few simple measures can lower your energy bills and reduce your carbon footprint, while more radical projects – such as the solar power installations and pollution- screening living walls profiled here – can bring countless benefits. Energy and water are a major part


of a school’s environmental impact and non-staff costs, but according to the DfE more than 20% of energy


Investing in eco initiatives may not seem like a priority when budgets are tight but, says Jane Hughes, it could pay off in more ways than one


is currently being wasted. Adopting good housekeeping rules and implementing conservation measures, it suggests, can save ten per cent on fuel bills and halve water usage. Moreover, getting pupils to buy into the idea of using resources carefully – through programmes such as Eco-Schools – will also pay dividends. In addition, the government-


funded, not-for-profit organisation Salix Finance offers interest-free loans for a range of energy-efficiency improvements, and has supported hundreds of schools over the past few years. For schools that are reluctant to take on additional debt, there are a growing number of community and crowdfunding options for financing a greener environment.


FundEd SPRING 2020 15


IMAGES: MAN AS THEP/ISTOCKPHOTO.COM


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