search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
MEET ME AT THE BAR A REVIEW OF THE UK HEALTH AND FITNESS MARKET


Concepts such as Ministry of Sound Fitness, which brands itself as the “first fitness nightclub”, are key indicators that cultures have changed and that the euphoria cravings previous generations may have found in bars or clubs are now being sought through fitness. With research suggesting that millennials are drinking less than previous generations, secondary spend at the gym is predicted to increase further in the future. With Ministry of Sound Fitness proving such a success, other joint ventures or tie ups with regional super clubs, such as Gatecrasher, may soon follow suit.


The growing social aspect of gyms is no more noticeable than in concepts such as CrossFit, which now has 500 affiliates in the UK. Crossfit has worked hard to foster a unique sense of community that encourages people to help each other with techniques, compare results, and discuss competitions.


This ‘Evolution of Experience’ also 17


translates to the rise of technology. Consumer demand for more scientific results, and better performance statistics, means technologically advanced classes and wearables will become an even greater part of a gym’s overall offer.


Occupiers who are successfully tapping into this trend and investing in technologies, such as MyZone, are able to increase membership rates and secondary spend by driving the engagement of gym goers and sustaining their motivation.


With health and wellbeing now sitting even higher on the agenda, there has been an increase in the number of sports and fitness-related concepts also seeking space – from ballet-inspired barre classes and gymnastics, to climbing and bouldering. Some of these spaces are easier to cater for than others, with a number of bouldering concepts only requiring a five metre floor to ceiling height.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20