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Oral Language


A Classifying objects In groups, spend time sorting, pattern-making and grouping objects. Use maths or art materials. What makes the objects similar/different? Why do they go together?


As you work, use descriptive language to (a) describe what you must do, (b) describe what you are doing, (c) describe what you have done.


Writing Genre – Report Writing


The language of reports should include: ƒ reference to what/who it is about, e.g. Helen, the tutor, they ƒ timeless present tense – are, have, is, belongs, protects ƒ factual, precise adjectives – inspiring legacy, positive people


Top tip!


Do not include first- person pronouns (I, my, etc.) or opinions.


A Review, edit and rewrite your biography report. Include the language of reports shown above. You could also use some long sentences with conjunctions.


Check your work using the report self-assessment checklist.


B Interview a relative or a person in your school. Create a list of factual questions. Write or record your interview and display it in the classroom.


Sample Interview Questions


ƒ What is your happiest memory? ƒ Do you prefer being an adult or when you were a child? Why?


ƒ What advice would you give me?


ƒ If you could be any animal, which one would you be and why?


ƒ What do you like to do for fun? ƒ Tell me about a funny time in your life.


ƒ What was the nicest thing you ever did for someone?


ƒ What do you think makes a good person? ƒ What is the best thing in the world?


60


Unit 10 | Report 2


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