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Oral Language


A simile is when you compare two things using the words like or as. In the poem ‘Abandoned Farmhouse’, the author compares the toys strewn all over the yard to branches after a storm:


Its toys are strewn in the yard like branches after a storm Other similes:


as cool as a cucumber as pale as a ghost sings like an angel as sly as a fox


as white as snow as timid as a rabbit like two peas in a pod eyes like a hawk


as cold as ice


A Can you think of some other similes? Keep a record of them here and try to use them in your writing.


Writing Genre – Poetry Writing


Blank verse is a type of poetry that does not rhyme. It gives the poet the freedom of description without any rules. ‘Abandoned Farmhouse’ is an example of blank verse.


A Write your own poem about an abandoned mansion. Plan your poem.


ƒ Create a spider diagram and brainstorm the words you will use. ƒ Use adjectives from the list you made in Unit 5. ƒ Gather some of your favourite similes to try out. ƒ Plan your characters. ƒ Evoke your senses – what can you see, touch, smell, hear and taste? ƒ How will you create the mood?


ƒ Will you use alliteration (when two or more nearby words have the same beginning sound)?


ƒ How will you leave the reader guessing?


B Music: Add sound effects to your poem by using home-made instruments. What can you use to create a sense of atmosphere?


90


Unit 15 | Poetry


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