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SECTOR FOCUS: AUTOMOTIVE HDDO


Enabling commercial vehicles to move cleaner


Alex Brewster, Product Manager Commercial Engine Lubricants, The Lubrizol Corporation


At the Paris Climate Agreement in 2019, the major economic powers agreed to limit global warming to well below 2°C and preferably below 1.5°C, compared to pre-industrial levels. Today, 194 nations have signed up to meet these goals. The target of net zero carbon dioxide (CO2


) by 2050 is seen as a critical


step in the journey to achieving this. Transportation is responsible for 21%1


of Europe’s total emissions of CO2. Governments and Original Equipment


Manufacturers (OEMs) have responded with targets which have mainly focused on the electrification of consumer vehicles, but commitments have also been made in the commercial vehicle sector.


The movement of freight is critical for economic prosperity. All indications show that there will be continued growth in the demand for the global movement of goods. In Europe, commercial vehicles transport 14.7 billion tonnes of goods per year, transporting 77% of all goods carried over land2


for the next two decades, the primary technology in commercial vehicles on the road in Europe will continue to be the diesel combustion engine.


Given this continued dominance of diesel engines, it is essential that emissions reduction is achieved not only from growth in the use of zero-emissions vehicles but also by continued optimisation of the internal combustion engine.


Huge progress has already been made since the introduction of the Euro emission standards in 1992 to reduce the emissions output of commercial vehicles. The Euro I-VI standards for Europe lead the way, with similar standards adopted in China, India and the US which reflect regional market conditions. These standards have largely addressed emissions in the form of nitrogen oxides (NOx


), particulate mass . As


this demand for freight movement over land increases, it is imperative that we transport materials more efficiently than ever. While electrification of passenger cars has its challenges, there is relative clarity on the roadmap to zero emissions. For commercial vehicles, however, the future is less clear, and a spectrum of powertrain options are being considered. Even so,


1 Road transport: Reducing CO2


(PM) and particulate number (PN). Euro VI hardware has been in place since January 1st, 2013 and has enabled the cleanest operating diesel powertrains ever. The next iteration of the Euro VI standard (Stage E) will become mandatory in September 2021 after initial introduction in September 2020. This highlights the fact that continual improvement is being made to the diesel powertrain in commercial vehicles.


emissions from vehicles | Climate Action (europa.eu) 2 Trucks, vans and buses | ACEA - European Automobile Manufacturers’ Association


14


LUBE MAGAZINE NO.164 AUGUST 2021


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