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Lube-Tech


untreated product increases in friction, the treated formulation maintained a lower friction coefficient throughout he stribeck curve (Fig. 15). The potential reduction in friction could be due to premature wear and change in the surface morphology.


Wear Volume Measurement Wear volume was calculated using vertical scanning white light interferometry on disk surface and in this case the film forming properties of the BSA has had a dramatic reduction on surface wear, (fig. 16).


PUBLISHED BY LUBE: THE EUROPEAN LUBRICANTS INDUSTRY MAGAZINE


No.126 page 6


Conclusion We tested with industry standards for applications such as gear oils. We did physical and chemical testing, lubricity, FZG and oxidative stability.


As the industry evolves, it is important that there are viable alternatives to Group I and Group II based bright stocks are made available which offer the following characteristics and advantages:


• Viscosity index booster and thickener • High lubricity and low wear • Offers excellent oxidation stability • Reduces deposits, varnishes and sludging • Suitable for replacing bright stocks • Soluble in Group I, II & III base oils


We found that Croda BSA is a viable alternative to bright stock, with additional properties to enhance the overall lubricant performance, and demonstrates the ways in which biobased alternatives can be utilised to equal or better commonly used bright stocks in formulations.


LINK www.crodalubricants.com


77% reduction in wear volume Fig 16: Wear track disk data.


LUBE MAGAZINE NO.155 FEBRUARY 2020


33


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