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Lube-Tech


To investigate this further additional testing took place using the ball on disk and carrying out a traction test. This was completed on all viscosity variants to establish how a change in viscosity grade would affect the potential for lubrication.


Fig 10: Barrel on Disk – Variable Load Test, ISO 150, 50% SRR.


The traction curve is a test at a constant speed and an increasing slide roll ratio (SRR). This test shows the potential for oil entrainment between two surfaces and in this case, a rotating ball and disk. As the SRR increases,the shear rate increases for that specific load and speed and a constant friction is attained which is related to the ability of a fluid to form a lubricating film.


Typically, increasing viscosity will increase the traction coefficient due to the inability of the fluid to entrain into the gap between the surfaces (in essence drag). This is the case with the bright stock based formulation (fig 11): There is a step increase in friction as the viscosity increases through each ISO grade.


PUBLISHED BY LUBE: THE EUROPEAN LUBRICANTS INDUSTRY MAGAZINE


No.126 page 4


This is the opposite for the BSA: Initially there is a slight reduction in the traction coefficient between the two ISO 150 grades but as the viscosity increases there is an initial drop in friction and then a constant friction, exhibiting the film forming potential of the BSA.


Further lubricity testing was centred around ASTM D5182, the industry standard, FZG Gear Load Wear test. There are 14 load stages used to categorise gear and hydraulic fluids with respect to their lubricating properties.


We utilised a method provided by Optimol Lubrication®


, utilising the SRV lubricity tester (DIN 51834-4), which simulates the loading used on the FZG test.


Again, we utilised the model industrial gear formulations as shown in Fig. 8 and the results can be seen in Fig 12. The additive package is rated as an FZG load stage 12 pass in a Group I based formulation.


Fig 12: FZG Gear Load test simulation at Load Stage 13.


Fig 11: Ball on Disk – Fixed speed and load variable SRR, Traction Curves 1.24 Gpa/70N, 500mm/s.


In this test we compared the lubricating nature of the bright stock against the BSA. The bright stock formulation reacted as expected with a pass at load stage 12, whereas the BSA has enhanced the capability of the additive package way beyond the prescribed and could be classified as a load stage 13+. The results clearly show the enhanced film forming properties achievable with the BSA.


LUBE MAGAZINE NO.155 FEBRUARY 2020 31


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