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SECTOR FOCUS: DIESEL OIL STANDARDS


standards explained engine oil Global


Patrick Wagner, Shell Product Application Specialist — Truck & Fleet, Rosemary Ran, Senior Project Leader, Shell Technology and Gagandeep Singh, Shell Global Brand Manager


In 2016, the American Petroleum Institute (API) approved two new diesel engine oil standards, CK-4 and FA-4. Intended for use with the latest and most efficient engines, these low-viscosity oil standards are designed to provide maximum fuel efficiency without compromising wear protection.


But the API is not the only standards body. As well as vehicle manufacturers like Volvo, which have their own standards, bodies such as the European Automobile Manufacturers Association (ACEA) and the Standardisation Administration of China are busy developing / updating new oil standards, specifically designed for their markets.


The API standards themselves are adopted and used in different ways in different markets, outside North America. So, what is happening with oil standards


22 LUBE MAGAZINE NO.155 FEBRUARY 2020


around the world and what does it mean for the industry?


API standards outside of North America The new API CK-4 standard is for oils designed to be used in high-speed four-stroke engines. Oils conforming to this standard are designed to provide enhanced protection against oil oxidation, viscosity loss due to shear, and oil aeration compared to the previous CJ-4 generation oils.


The FA-4 oils provide a high-level of wear protection even at low viscosity, allowing for the best combination of lubrication, engine performance and fuel efficiency. These oils are specifically designed to help lower greenhouse-gas emissions in modern engines designed to accommodate the lower viscosity.


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