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The performance of synthetic oils is traditionally more impressive, most notably in terms of low-temperature pumpability and high-temperature stability and protection against deposits. These properties help reduce engine wear, increase fuel economy and maximise engine longevity. Lower-viscosity synthetic oil offers less resistance in an engine; therefore, engines operating with synthetics provide maximum horsepower and fuel efficiency compared to those using conventional oil.


Developed specifically to grapple with extreme conditions inherent to modern engines, synthetic oils flow more easily than conventional oils. When an engine is first started, the oil takes some time to circulate to prevent friction and wear. The faster the oil circulates, the better it will protect against wear. A synthetic lubricant with exceptional cold-weather properties will circulate much quicker and provide more immediate start-up protection. Synthetics help the engine reach peak operating efficiency much quicker.


The shift from higher-viscosity oils to lower-viscosity oils over the past half a century is sufficient reason for an uninformed consumer to assume low-viscosity oils are


better. This assumption is supported by fuel economy data. Automakers have been forced to increase the fuel efficiency of their vehicles since the oil crisis of the 1970s and into the present day. Newer engines use lower-viscosity oils, which assists in boosting fuel economy. Mark Sztenderowicz of Chevron estimates that if two identical engines were running 10W-40 and 0W-20 oil, the engine running 0W-20 oil would increase fuel economy about three percent.


Many people do not know there is a difference between synthetic-blend oils and fully synthetic oils. The term “blend” added after “synthetic” implies just as it sounds. A synthetic-blend is a combination of synthetic and conventional base oils. This is in contrast to fully synthetic oil, which contains no conventional base oils at all. Instead, fully synthetic oil uses synthetic base oils mixed with a variety of additives that boost the performance of the oil and offer superior engine protection. The mixture of high-performance fluids and additives aid in preventing wear, maintaining viscosity, reducing friction, preventing rust and maintaining engine cleanliness. This results in a lubricant that remains liquid and flows easily throughout a variety of temperatures and engine conditions.


Continued on page 14 12 LUBE MAGAZINE NO.155 FEBRUARY 2020


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