search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Hanga Talk


Classic Air Medical Pilot Celebrates Career Milestone


Matt Stein, the chief operating officer and certified helicopter pilot with the Classic Air Medical base in Lake Powell, recently celebrated


a career milestone – his 3,000th patient flight.


Classic Air Medical Chief Executive Officer Tony Henderson presented the flight wings to Matt Stein in a ceremony at the base.


A Los Angeles native, Stein began working for Classic Air Medical in 1992. “I first started as an EMS pilot at the Page base. Things were quite different back then; we covered over 4,000 square miles with one Bell 206L3 and no other operators in the region,” he said. “Having successfully flown 3,000 patients is a great feeling to realize a goal that you’ve strived for, and doing it safely. I’m going to Disneyland next week.”


The best part of being an Air Medical pilot, he added, is a rare combination of having the ability to help people in need during challenging conditions and having a great deal of enjoyment in accomplishing the mission. “To be a part of the team that is going to be the best part of someone’s worst day, to help them and provide life-saving care and rapid transport,” Stein added. “I feel very honored and thankful.”


When asked if any flights were more memorable or difficult than others, Stein said, “Considering that roughly half of my 25 years at Classic was flying without night vision goggles, those unaided flights were the most challenging. There was a particular night flight (with goggles) that’s at the top of my list with a woman from Ticaboo that was hiking Ticaboo Canyon who fell and broke both legs. Her husband found her hours later after dark and left her with a fire to stay warm before going for help. Unfortunately she passed out and rolled onto the fire causing severe burns. We were eventually called to the scene but initially snow showers and low ceilings were halting our approach. We decided to wait at Halls Crossing for the weather to clear. After 45 minutes another attempt


Henderson said it is a pleasure and an honor to have Stein on the team. “The fact that he has reached this 3,000-flight level is a testament to his dedication,” Henderson said. “It goes far beyond the 3,000 patient flights, however. Stein started with Classic Air Medical as a pilot, went on and became our chief operating officer, and is a key member of our management team.”


Henderson said only about 10 percent of EMS pilots ever reach the 3,000th patient flight status.


“That makes our base in Lake Powell the most experienced team in the fleet,” he said. “It is humbling to be part of such a great and dedicated team.”


was made, this time flying up the canyon from Lake Powell. We were able to land on-scene. The patient was then flown to Cal Black Airport where a Classic fixed-wing aircraft continued the flight to the Salt Lake City burn center due to mountain obscuration en route. She survived.”


8,500


The approx. number of industry professionals expected at


AUVSI Xponential in Denver (April 30-May 3). Rotorcraft Pro will be at the event for the unmanned aerial vehicle industry providing bonus distribution of our magazine.


32 Jan/Feb 2018


412.93


The km/h speed record set by the world’s fastest helicopter, the Lynx Mk9 being retired from the British army. See page 20 for details.


22


The number of nations visited by Shaesta Waiz in her successful record setting global solo flight to promote STEM education. The Afghan refugee overcame great obstacles to live her dreams. See her inspiring story at dreamssoar.org


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88