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RPMN: What do you enjoy doing on your days off?


On my days off I enjoy anything outdoors, such as cycling, camping, and hiking, or visiting friends and family.


RPMN: Have you ever had an ‘Oh, crap’ moment in a helicopter? Can you summarize what happened?


I never had an engine failure or had the ‘Jesus nut’ fly off, thank goodness! However, I have had the occasional chip light, oil pressure dropping to zero, smoke in the cockpit, bird strikes, and FADEC problems. All were landed without incident. That is the great thing about helicopters; you can land them just about anywhere, anytime there is a problem.


RPMN: In your view, what is the greatest challenge for the helicopter industry at this moment in time?


In my view, CFIT is still one of the greatest challenges in the helicopter industry. Pilots are still running perfectly good helicopters into the ground. There are numerous weather resources out there that can assist pilots in making go or no-go decisions. However, I believe the number-one resource is the pilot himself or herself. If something doesn’t feel right: stop, put it on the ground, or if able, turn around. You should know your personal


limitations. Just because your company minimums are lower than your personal minimums, that doesn’t mean you should fly. I am fortunate to work for a company who states I can cancel or terminate any flight at any time for any reason.


Do you know someone who would be a good subject for Meet a Rotorcraft Pro? Email your suggestion to the editor-in-chief:


lyn.burks@rotorcraftpro.com


PORTABLE, RELIABLE, START PAC!


RPMN: If you could give only one piece of advice to a new helicopter pilot, what would it be?


The helicopter industry is a small community and your reputation will follow you as a pilot. My best advice is, always be honest and professional. If you make a mistake such as over-torquing the aircraft, cause a little hangar rash, or overfly an inspection, admit your mistake and live to fly another day. Don’t try to hide it or not report it. Even the smallest lie will have your peers second- guessing your integrity and it will likely follow you your entire aviation career. I have seen and read about pilots getting fired just because they did not report something or lied about it. If they were up-front and honest in the first place, they would have kept their job. Everyone makes mistakes.


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www.STARTPAC.com OR TOLL FREE 844.901.9987


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