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CONSTRUCTION


The double-height treatment space 10 metres below Devonshire Mews West; 1,550 cubic metres of concrete were used to create this subterranean space.


Land use swap agreed


The original HSMA project site comprised two Grade II-listed buildings on Harley Street and Devonshire Mews West within the Harley Street Conservation Area and the Harley Street Special Policy Area. The project began as a standard medical refurbishment; the existing site included a medical building and residential buildings, which were knocked through to create one large medical building. Julian Best said: “To create the most efficient use of the available space, we were able to undertake a land use swap in close vicinity of the project site to transfer the necessary residential floorspace. It was during this design stage that Advanced Oncotherapy came on board as the future provider of equipment for the facility, and the project evolved into a Proton Beam Therapy Centre.”


In 2015, Advanced Oncotherapy was granted a 50-year lease for a 15,000 ft2 facility, and undertook to meet the cost of redevelopment. Julian Best explained: “The size of the site grew further following a partnership with The London Clinic, an independent charitable hospital which will be operating the proton beam therapy unit inside the listed building in Harley Street, as part of its ongoing commitment to advancing healthcare. There are now plans for Advanced Oncotherapy to lease part of The London Clinic’s premises to install a second treatment room.” In this key partnership, Advanced Oncotherapy provides the LIGHT proton beam accelerator and a vast array of equipment, while The London Clinic will operate the facility by sourcing and managing the specialist trained staff, and managing governance


and other services necessary for the facility’s clinical operation.”


Planning the project


In addition to providing accommodation suitable for the proton beam therapy facility, the project had to respect and protect the buildings’ historic character and heritage. The restoration and improvement works needed not only to deliver a ‘best-in-class’ medical facility, but also to enhance the setting of the neighbouring properties and the surrounding area.


During the pre-application stage with Westminster City Council, Sonnemann Toon Architects obtained consent for a lift to be added to the rear of 141 Harley


The shaft of the multi-purpose bed lift – one of three lifts and seven staircases.


Street, and to demolish and excavate a substantial amount of the existing site to house the proton beam therapy facility. David Wright from Sonnemann Toon Architects recalled: “Westminster Council supported proposals for the excavation of three additional metres under the highway within the mews. This created crucial space for the medical facility. During the planning negotiations, Howard de Walden undertook an intensive public engagement process, including neighbour consultation evenings, one-on-one individual neighbours’ meetings, and speaking to Ward Councillors and the local amenity society. The application for the project was approved by the planning committee in October 2016.”


The exposed original timber roof of the listed building above. September 2020 Health Estate Journal 87


©David Parker Photography


©David Parker Photography


©David Parker Photography


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