This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
SPECIALIST VENTILATION


The building design process had to take these additional needs into account, providing the flexibility to allow the installation of operating rooms on the first floor, and working closely with medical experts to ensure that the area was completely suitable for this purpose.


A collaborative effort


Most of the design process was undertaken before final decisions were taken as to the vast majority of the laboratories’ end-users. As a result, in consultation with Imperial College, the project team had to create floors with the flexibility to suit a wide range of research groups. Once the designations had been narrowed down, this flexibility enabled the fit-out to be modified during the construction process, with the project team working with the college and end-users to determine the detailed design of each lab.


Day-to-day operations also had to be agreed to ensure that proposed energy savings could be implemented safely. Buro Happold worked closely with the Imperial College safety team throughout the process to consider where certain scientific activities should take place, reducing the air change rate in the majority of labs to four per hour, significantly lower than the majority of other laboratory buildings. Reducing the air change rate in this way lowers the amount of air which needs to be conditioned, allowing for greater energy changes. However, before attempting this the team had to be sure that it could be achieved while still maintaining the functionality of each room. This work was carried out on the basis that end-users would be containing chemical usage to controlled areas and devices such as fume


Richard Walder


Richard Walder is an associate director at Buro Happold, and is currently the company’s Science and Technology UK Sector lead. He joined Buro Happold in 2005 after graduating from Loughborough University with a First Class Master’s degree in Mechanical Engineering, and has since worked on projects across the world, and in sectors ranging from education, to commercial, healthcare, science, and technology. He has led the MEP design for a number of large research laboratories, including Containment Level 2 & 3 facilities, cleanrooms, and co-located clinical facilities to HTM standards, including Europe’s largest endoscopy


facility. On several projects he has worked closely with wind tunnel testing facilities to develop low energy fume extract systems which consider the specific chemical handling protocols of the facility to deliver safe, low-cost solutions. He works closely with laboratory users and planners to deliver elegant engineering designs which meet the needs of the users, while building in the flexibility so often critical to institutions operating in changing scientific environments.


cabinets, rather than carrying out chemical work in the open air. Without collaboration between the design team and the college, these savings would not have been possible.


Design and modelling using BIM Every element of the building was designed and modelled using BIM (Building Information Modelling). This was key to facilitating collaboration between the project team and the client, with BIM used as a means of showing the overall aesthetic effect, which includes much of the services distribution being exposed to view, rather than just as a ‘back of house’ tool for the construction


team. It also helped to bring forward the sustainable design elements of the project, which aim to allow it to achieve BREEAM certification.


The Sir Michael Uren Biomedical Engineering Hub will house a diverse range of researchers, meaning flexibility was crucial, both in its design and its continuing day-to-day operations. The detailed analysis of the ventilation solution has enabled this research hub to be delivered safely on a constrained campus site, while reducing running costs and carbon emissions, and providing a new home for a range of disciplines, and for work that will sit at the forefront of biomedical research.


hej


September 2020 Health Estate Journal 47


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92