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STRATEGY ▶▶▶


Blueprint for sustainable egg production


Egg farmers of Canada has released its first Sustainability Report, outlining how egg farmers there are investing in and implementing sustainable technology and practices. The Report also covers initiatives and programmes that set out new opportunities for the future.


BY TREENA HEIN


“Canadians egg farmers have re- duced green- house gas emis- sions, heating and electricity use, and increas- ingly use LED lights, renewa- ble energy and other efficien- cies,” says EFC CEO Tim Lambert.


T


he first Sustainability Report from Egg Farmers of Canada (EFC) has been released. Above all, it sets out a blueprint, says EFC chair, Roger Pelissero, “for how we can build on our current practices as we


grow our industry, putting egg farming at the forefront of sustainable agriculture”. The Report covers many key themes. It further sets out EFC’s commitment to sustainability, pre- sents concrete ways in which egg farmers are making chang- es and highlights recent advances in the Canadian egg indus- try. Before diving into some specifics, here is a quick overview of the long-term progress made in Canadian egg production. Compared to five decades ago, 50% more eggs are now be- ing produced in Canada while the sector’s overall environ- mental footprint is almost 50% smaller. Research has specifi- cally found that between 1962 and 2012, Canadian egg


farmers reduced energy use by 41% and water consumption by 69%. Adoption of technology, such as automatic adjust- ments to the barn environment, has played a role, as have precision agricultural techniques. In 2015, EFC conducted a life-cycle assessment (LCA) to understand more precisely how the production of eggs affects the environment in terms of resource use and emissions. “Canadian egg farmers have re- duced greenhouse gas emissions, heating and electricity use, and increasingly use LED lights, renewable energy and other efficiencies,” adds EFC CEO Tim Lambert. “Genetics continue to improve and feed companies are working towards better digestibility, immune system support and more.”


Current initiatives EFC is now working towards the launch of a new way to inform sustainability activity and decision-making for egg farmers in Canada and potentially in other countries, too – the National Environmental Sustainability Tool (NEST). It’s expected to hit


6 ▶ POULTRY WORLD | No. 3, 2021


PHOTO: IEC


PHOTO: PETER ROEK


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