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Research by Weaver in 2020 looked into the impact of chronic intake of naturally multi-mycotoxin-contaminated feed (aflatoxin B1, DON, 3-DON, 15-DON, HT-2 toxin, fusaric acid and fumonisins) with or without titers of yeast cell wall extract (YCWE; Mycosorb A+) on day-old male Cobb chicks. This study suggests that broiler performance and intestinal health are impacted by chronic intake of naturally occurring multi-mycotoxin-contaminated feed. Broilers fed YCWE dur- ing the mycotoxin challenge showed improved perfor- mance, gut health and efficiency over 42 days. These results indicate that YCWE, particularly at 0.2%, had a protective ef- fect against mycotoxins and improved production efficiency metrics (Figures 1–4).


Mycotoxin impact on gut biochemistry Aflatoxins fed to broiler chickens decreased pancreatic se- cretions, whereas aflatoxins fed to layers increased the pro- duction of pancreatic enzymes. Intestinal morphology (in- testinal crypt depth) and the specific activity of intestinal


disaccharidase and maltase were also altered by feeding AFB1. This generates a change in the chemistry of the lumi- nal environment. The bacteria that are most suitable to the new luminal environment will have more chance of success- fully multiplying. In addition to the morphological changes induced in the intestinal villi by DON, it is suggested that this mycotoxin inhibits Na+ transport and Na+-D-glucose co-transport in the jejunum of layers. This results in reduced glucose uptake when the intestine is exposed to DON con- centrations of 10mg/L. Similarly, in layers, DON affects the intestinal absorption of the amino acids that are co-trans- ported with sodium, such as L-proline. So, the quality and quantity of nutrients available in the intestinal lumen changes as the absorption capacity is altered. It is likely that species of bacteria that can successfully ferment the new ‘luminal diet’ will predominate in the lumen. Sub-chronic ingestion of DON, comparable with concentra- tions occurring in contaminated food and feed, was report- ed to impair the intestinal transfer and uptake of nutrients.


▶ POULTRY WORLD | No. 3, 2021


To effectively manage the in- evitability of feed mycotoxin contamination, it is crucial to understand the level of myco- toxin challenges.


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