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After 24 hours on this scrub land the pigs have made quite a difference.


McIntosh says, “African Swine Fever is present in the local area but we don’t change any of our protocols. Our pigs are healthy because they live outdoors. The only other major challenge we face is getting the market to appreciate and accordingly pay for outdoor-raised pork.” On the pig enterprise McIntosh employs two staff who live in the local township. Plenty of local labour is available but he also likes to use technology to increase efficiencies when it comes to managing the pigs. McIntosh says, “We are not


investing heavily in new technology but we do use solar- powered temporary electric fences to manage the pigs in the fields and keep them in the right place, which I have to say are superb.” McIntosh says the areas that the pigs have grazed had a 24% higher carbon content compared to areas just metres away where they had not been scavenging. In fact, 7,101 tonnes of CO2


has been sequestered on the farm since 2017. Such is the success of the McIntosh type of regenerative farming.


26


▶ PIG PROGRESS | Volume 37, No. 7, 2021


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