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Pigs roam the poorer land and are moved once per week to new pasture.


Water is provided from a mobile tanker in the field.


pasture and soil time to regenerate and fully recover. A mini- mum of six weeks passes before the pastures are grazed again. When the pigs are ready for slaughter and the pig meat is processed, McIntosh has his own method of retailing it to achieve the best returns. He says, “Our pigs are fed the only non-GMO pig food in South Africa at a rate of 2.7 kg per pig per day. It is bought in from Profile Feeds as we don’t grow any crops ourselves. Mineral licks are also provided and, once a week, the local big retailer drops off around eight tonnes of expired fruit and veg which we feed to the pigs as well.” He added, “The pigs are sold to our charcuterie producer at


Solar-powered electric fences keep the pigs in the right place.


the market price when they are ready. Then we buy the cured meat back and resell it to retail outlets ourselves.”


Mortality rate is low McIntosh says that by using this pig production system his mortality rate is very low, only losing around three pigs per year. He also insists that no pigs are lost to thieves as the land is off the beaten track and because the pigs are almost im- possible to catch. Also, he adds that antibiotics are only used when absolutely necessary, and the pigs receive a dewormer along with their feed.


▶ PIG PROGRESS | Volume 37, No. 7, 2021


www.pigprogress.net/ worldofpigs


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