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Non-conventional dietary sources can be used to reduce feed costs, but they might not be as readily digestible, since the animal may lack the necessary endogenous digestive en- zymes and, as such, will derive less nutrition from the feed. Using exogenous enzymes helps make the feed more digesti- ble and, as a result, increases the nutritional value of these non-conventional feed sources for animal nutrition. Over the past 20 years, feed enzyme utilisation has evolved. As feed di- ets have become more complex to combat the rising costs of traditional feed components, enzymes have been added with the expectation that they will maximise the nutrient availabil- ity of feed and thus result in improved animal performance. However, the characteristics of enzymes can vary widely de- pending on the microbial strain from which they are sourced and how they are produced.


A unique fermentation system Most feed enzyme production originates from using both bacterial and fungal microorganisms produced through one of two processes: submerged fermentation (SmF) or sol- id-state fermentation (SSF). Alltech has invested in SSF technology, which utilises a non- GMO organism − typically, a fungus − that grows on a high-fi- bre feedstuff to produce a host of natural enzymes. The goal of using SSF is to produce a multi-enzyme complex that will work on the many fibre substrates in the diet, not just one or two specific substrates, to reduce their anti-nutritional ef- fects. The use of SSF for commercial enzyme production has been extensively researched over the past 20 years. SSF sys- tems can be tailored to address specific needs based on the microbial selection and the multiple substrates in the diets. For example, Aspergillus niger produces a multi-enzyme


product that contains phytase, protease, amylase, xylanase, cellulase and β-glucanase. Alltech has invested in numerous PhD programmes established to study enzyme technology via SSF. These programmes have focused on how to improve production efficiencies in fermentation systems. All of our re- search examines the continuation of non-GMO organisms to bring more sustainable technologies to the industry. The All- tech Enzyme Management programme offers unique feed enzyme technologies backed by science that work in synergy with the animal’s digestive tract to optimise the potential of the feed. Allzyme SSF helps maximize feed utilisation and ef- ficiency by targeting multi-substrates in the diet. In addition, Allzyme Vegpro offers an enzyme complex specifically de- signed for vegetal protein sources, helping animals optimise the digestibility and utilisation of nutrients, especially proteins. Over the past two years, we have focused our research on im- proving our enzyme technology even more. Poultry trials have been conducted recently, and more are in progress throughout the world. We believe that these new develop- ments will offer increased nutrient utilisation by improving feed digestibility while promoting greater cost savings.


In the near future, enzymes will be the key When looking at feed options, the use of enzymes has emerged as an important contribution to establishing a solution for the increased sustainability of animal production. Our feed enzyme technologies have implications beyond cost savings: our range of feed enzymes also helps improve gut health and animal welfare, while reducing environmen- tal impact, allowing producers to potentially triple their bottom line.


▶ ALL ABOUT FEED | Volume 29, No. 1, 2021 21


The use of enzymes has emerged as an important contribution to the sustaina- bility of animal production.


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