search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
oilseeds and protein crops. He adds that insect meals, pro- cessed animal protein (PAP) from poultry and pigs, marine ingredients, yeast, algae and so on “can all make a valuable contribution to further reducing the EU’s reliance on import- ed Hi-Pro vegetable protein (protein sources containing 30- 50% protein).” However, FEFAC urges setting realistic targets and the addressing of trade-offs between competing targets. Döring adds that market access to imported vegetable proteins will remain crucial. On the subject of 25% organic food production in the EU by 2030, Döring says this is understood to be an aspirational tar- get. He adds that this target would be easier to obtain in sec- tors such as aquaculture, dairy and table egg production, but that “there are many more economic constraints in sectors such as broiler and pig production.” FEFAC is also “pleading” for a ‘One Nutrition’ programme at the EU level, which integrates cutting-edge nutritional sci- ence on plant, animal and human nutrition “in order to stimu- late a holistic approach to defining specific sectoral sustaina- bility indicators to improve nutrient efficiency along the whole agricultural and food production chain.”


The role of insect ingredients Insect production can play a major role in helping the EU feed sector align with the sustainability parameters of the Deal. One way that insect production is sustainable is in the food the insects themselves consume. Insects in the EU are


currently fed a mix of by- and co-products from the agri-food industries, reports Constantin Muraru, communications man- ager at the International Platform of Insects for Food and Feed (IPIFF), which represents the interests of the insect pro- duction sector. They are also fed resources which are not cur- rently destined for human consumption (the so-called ‘former foodstuffs’). “The above mentioned by-/co-products may also include those derived from grains, starch, fruit and vegetable supply chains (e.g. bran, distillers grains, unsold fruit and veg- etables, including peels) as well as products arising from the food manufacturing process (other than final products),” ex- plains Muraru. “Among the most frequently used former foodstuffs used in insect farming, we can highlight unused outputs from local food producers, such as bakery products, or products from supermarkets which are unsold due to tech- nical or logistical reasons.” Going forward, IPIFF hopes this trend will accelerate, with its members committed to making “a bolder contribution” to the EU’s target of halving food waste by 2030. “To this end, one of the primary objectives is to facilitate food waste avoidance – by redirecting products intended for human consumption (which would not have other uses and would otherwise be discarded) – to insect farms,” says Muraru. “From a regulatory point of view, one necessary step is the authorisation of former foodstuffs con- taining meat and fish. On this subject, IPIFF is collaborating with the European Commission in order to diversify the list of permitted substrates for insect farming activities.”


▶ ALL ABOUT FEED | Volume 29, No. 1, 2021


The Green Deal ‘Farm to Fork’ Strategy aims to accelerate the transition to a sustainable food system.


11


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44