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PLANT EXTRACTS ▶▶▶


Polyphenols for feed preservation and animal nutrition


A great deal of research is done on the use of polyphenols in animal nutrition and on feed preservation. It seems that one of the most important features of phenolic compounds is their antioxidant activity.


BY JUAN JAVIERRE, NUTRITION SCIENTIST AT LAYN NATURAL INGREDIENTS P


olyphenols are a class of natural compounds that are present in all vascular plants and they are char- acterised by the presence of one or several benzene rings bearing one or more hydroxyl functionalities


(from the phenolic hydroxyl group). Sources of polyphenols include tea, grapes, olives, coffee, chocolate, peanuts and


other botanicals. Phenol compounds play important roles in plant growth and development, particularly in defense mech- anisms. One of the most important features of phenolic com- pounds is antioxidant activity, which is closely related to their chemical structure. Flavonoids are the largest and most wide- ly studied group of polyphenols. They have a basic structure with two benzene rings linked through a heterocyclic pyrone C-ring (Figure 1). There are seven subclasses, and more than 8,000 different molecules have been identified to date. Many researchers have published numerous papers on the use of polyphenols in animal nutrition and health over the last 15 years. Layn and TruGro have also conducted proprietary research on polyphenols for animals and pets. We refer to these bodies of research here.


Technological antioxidation Energy production is important in animal diets, and fats and oils are important sources that are often included in feed for- mulations. When these are unprotected, auto-oxidation of fat and oils may: • Threaten and/or reduce their energy content • Reduce the amount of liposoluble vitamins • Give rise to “off” flavors and odours that impact feed intake •


Polyphenol-based combinations have been shown to be very potent antioxidants for fats and oils. They can replace syn- thetic antioxidants on a one-to-one basis and do not have the regulatory limits imposed on synthetic phenols, which makes them ideal for especially demanding applications.


Studies have shown both improved meat quality and shelf life extension when chickens received dietary polyphenols during their growth phase.


18 ▶ ALL ABOUT FEED | Volume 28, No. 8, 2020


Keeping oxidative stress in check According to many researchers, oxidative stress, i.e., an imbal- ance between oxidant and antioxidant entities at a cellular level, is the root cause of many common disturbances within the body, acute or otherwise. This imbalance in animals may be influenced by many factors, including: • Mycotoxins • Feed ingredients


Interact with metabolic processes leading to potential toxic disturbances


CREDIT: LAYN NATURAL INGREDIENTS


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