search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
PARTNER FEATURE ▶▶▶


Wood lignans are bioactive substances


The ban on antibiotic growth promoters creates a market for natural alternatives and wood lignans are promising candidates.


BY DR NINA NEUFELD T NC


Virginiamycin agromed® ROI


Feed intake d 1-42, g End weight d 42, g FCR d 1-42 Carcass, % Breast, % Thigh, %


E. coli, log10 CFU/g


Clostridium, log10 CFU/g Lactobacillus, log10 CFU/g


12


negative control --- ---


4,348d 2,626c 1.71d 67.8d 31.7c 31.9 6.58a 8.57a 4.29c


he subtherapeutic use of antibiotics as growth pro- moters (AGP) has been practiced for decades to im- prove performance and to reduce the incidence of certain diseases. Due to the problem of increasing


resistance, which massively impairs the effectiveness of ther- apeutic antibiotics in humans and animals, many countries have banned antibiotic performance enhancers. Restrictions in the use of AGPs have led to an increased incidence of dis- eases which are associated with considerable economic loss- es, e.g. necrotic enteritis (NE) in broilers. So the global trend is to find alternatives; several substances such as phytogenics, essential oils, enzymes, organic acids, and pre- and probiotics are being explored for this purpose. This article presents wood lignans as an interesting natural alternative to AGPs. Wood lignans − a new class of active substances for feed purposes − have delivered remarkably positive effects on the performance of broilers and weaning pigs in various


Table 1 – Trial design, performance data and faecal bacterial counts .


PC


positive control


16.5 ppm ---


4,328c 2,627c 1.68c 68.6c 31.1d 31.9


5.21bc 7.74a 6.98b


NC + wood


lignans ---


400 ppm 4,511b 3,132a 1.46a 68.9b 33.5a 32.0 4.74c 6.47bc 7.94a


▶ ALL ABOUT FEED | Volume 28, No. 8, 2020


PC + wood


lignans


16.5 ppm 400 ppm 4,621a 3,076b 1.52b 69.6a 32.5b 31.7


4.96bc 6.53c 7,31ab


experiments (product agromed® ROI, Agromed Austria GmbH). Wood lignans are bioactive substances with strong antioxidative, anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial proper- ties. In scientific studies supplementation of lignans modu- lates inflammatory events in the small intestine of animals with endotoxin (LPS)-induced inflammation. Various factors such as NE or weaning lead to subclinical inflammation in the gut. These symptoms are associated with energy consump- tion and protein loss at the expense of the animal’s perfor- mance. The consequence is unsatisfactory weight gain and feed conversion.


Wood lignans for broilers Current trial results focus on these relationships. A trial with total 416 male broilers (Cobb 500) compared the effects of a wood lignan product (agromed ROI) either to a negative con- trol (NC) or a positive control (PC) with the commonly used AGP Virginiamycin in a corn/soybean diet. The wood lignans had a significant positive influence on performance data in terms of weight gain, feed conversion, carcass and breast muscle percentage.Positive effects were also recorded for some parameters of intestinal health. Villus height in the ileum increased significantly in the lignan groups and con- sequently also the mucosal surface available for nutrient


Figure 1 - Curves of weight developments for the AGP supplemented group (PC) and the wood lignan supplemented group (NC + wood  performance development.


3000 3500


500 1000 1500 2000 2500


45 0 0 510 45 PC NC + ROI


3177 2672


2464 1968 1003 660 224


225 15


20 25 day of trial 30 35 40 45


body weight, g


PHOTO: AGROMED


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40