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chair, or they need a car seat. So, we verify all of that information, too, because you can’t show up without the correct equipment,” Carey stressed. ALC normally contracts all of its drivers, who provide


their own vehicles and are identified from a particular pool of applicants. “Our driver pool is very different. We’re not training a


bus driver,” Carey said. “We’re working with local service providers that are already local service providers. They are transporting within that community, and might be doing nonemergency medical transportation, or doing dialysis runs during the day.” It’s a different story for all alternative transportation


providers operating in California because of a new law that prohibits the use of contracted “gig” workers. For example, ALC must contract directly with transportation service pro-


viders such as LLC or S Corp. that employ full-time drivers. Meanwhile, HopSkipDrive is an example of a trans-


portation network company, a description designed to differentiate providers from other app-based, on-demand services, such as Uber and Lyft rideshares. HopSkipDrive employs what it calls “CareDrivers,” many of whom are former social workers. In addition to having five years of previous caregiving experience, these drivers must pass a 15-point background check. CareDrivers must also provide a vehicle that is less than 10 years old and passes annual inspections. The service was initially launched in Los Angeles in


2014 by busy parents who were struggling to juggle their children’s after-school activities with work obligations. At first, it operated similar to Uber and Lyft, in that par- ents could access rides via an app. And they still can.


Alternate Transportation Modes Used by Readers


53% District vans 34% ‘Other’ arrangement (parent reimbursement, paratransit)


29% Contracted alternative transportation providers


4% Transportation network companies (Out of 146 responses to a recent STN readership survey. More than one answer possible. Total does not equal 100.)


See Us At TSD Booth 315 48 School Transportation News • MARCH 2020

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