search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
offer an integrated system that can also help with Medicaid reimbursement. “If a bus driver leaves the bus without going back to check, the alarm


activates, including the horn and all of the lights. You can’t miss it,” said Car- los Chicas, transportation director for the Capistrano Valley Unified School District, which also implemented Child Check-Mate to comply with the law. Even before installing that system, the district had a Zonar tablet-based system that required the driver to sign off that they had inspected the inte- rior of the bus. Administrators are alerted by text if the driver leaves the bus without certifying they have performed the inspection.


Shared Transportation Services Accounting System


Optimize Your Entire Accounting Operation To Get More Done In A Shorter Amount of Time


“I actually prefer that method. I like the fact that the driver has to attest to the inspection and actually sign off with a digital signature,” said Chicas. “With the button, people can get so caught up [in their thoughts that they] just go back and touch the button. But it doesn’t actually mean you are checking. I’m big on technology, but I think this is a case where a problem needed to be addressed and we kind of threw a regulation at it without being very thoughtful.” Likewise, the San Juan Unified School District in Northern California had a ridership-tracking system that was used for Medicaid reimbursement before spending an “extraordinary amount of money to be compliant” with the Paul Lee law, according to Dayle Cantrall, the special education program administrator and transpor- tation liaison for the district. The district receives about $30,000


a year through transportation-related Medicaid reimbursement, since its fleet of specialized buses transports about 1,500 special needs students. “In these kinds of times, you wouldn’t step over $30,000. You put a little ex- tra effort in, to make sure you do the billing,” Cantrall stressed. Meanwhile, Robinson emphasized


 Centralize student information for each district


 Ensure contractor payments are accurate to avoid over payments


 Maximize efficiency by reducing costs for combining fuel, insurance and driver’s salaries


 Combine shared costs to be distributed for district billing


 Ensure total accountability of all of your special needs routing requirements


 Provide data to state and federal government for revenue maximization


424 King Street Pottstown, PA 19464 www.busboss.com (866) 740-8994


See Us At TSD Booth 324 44 School Transportation News • MARCH 2020 Bus Boss_0320_HI.indd 1 2/5/20 10:38 AM


that as efficient as technology may be, it shouldn’t replace old-fashioned driver training and behavior. That means knowing the students, their individual needs and being aware of when they are on the bus. Likewise, a fair amount of manual


work and communication needs to happen to turn automatically gener- ated documents into reimbursement. “Regardless of how good tech-


nology claims to be, there’s a lot of human interaction that needs to take place,” said Robinson. “The idea is not to become over-reliant on technol- ogy. Even with the best technology, there still needs to be a driver and attendant and training,” she stressed. “There has to be coordination with the local office and school district. The tracking by itself will not give you dollars back.” ●


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76