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FOOD & DRINK “Introducing


smell training is a straightforward


intervention around mealtimes.”


Introducing smell training is a straightforward intervention around mealtimes. Care givers can introduce sensory stimulation and that could be as simple as a drop of essential oil on each paper serviette to sniff before or aſter the meal, or a flannel, with a drop of essential oil, which has been microwaved to be warm for wiping the face before/aſter the meal. This and many other tips for working in care settings can be found at the recent symposium at the Institute Paul Bocuse.


Smell training is simple and can be a positive activity that can be part of mealtime or a dedicated activity for carers to offer during the day. There are many resources on how


twitter.com/TomorrowsCare


to create smell training kits on the AbScent website. Smell training can be helpful for the elderly. Regular exposure twice daily to aromatic substances can improve mood, verbal task completion, and olfactory test scores.


Carers should watch out for any loss of appetite which should always be seen in light of the person’s overall health. Loss of smell is important and should be taken seriously. Loss of interest in the outside world, isolation, depression – these may not ‘just’ be signs of ageing but also signs of smell loss.


https://abscent.org - 31 -


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