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FEATURE


Training Day


Age UK has launched a new training course to inspire greater understanding of dementia among care professionals. Aptly named Remember Me, Tomorrow’s Care finds out more about the new programme.


Over 800,000 people aged 65 and over are currently living with dementia in the UK. This figure is predicted to double by 2050. These growing numbers bring many new challenges, particularly when it comes to care. In an attempt to tackle these obstacles, Age UK’s training arm has extended its range of exclusive courses with a new dementia focused training programme called Remember Me.


Dementia currently costs the economy an estimated £23 billion a year and Remember Me has been designed to encourage better understanding among health and social care practitioners who support older people living with the condition. The brand new training course places participants in the shoes of a person living with dementia, providing valuable insight into the challenges faced and giving users first-hand experience of what it feels like to live with the condition.


Speaking about the new initiative, Nyree Guider, National Manager at Age UK Training, commented: “With the number of people living with dementia predicted to rise, we recognise the need for better support to improve the quality of life for both older people living with dementia and those caring for them. We’re proud


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to launch Remember Me, offering a deeper understanding of what it is like for people living with dementia, aiming to highlight specific needs and requirements. Our trainers are experts in their field with the experience and teaching skills to engage practitioners and inspire new ways of thinking.”


The training programme represents the importance of understanding every individual living with dementia for who they are.


Using real case studies and practical learning methods, including role play, interactive workshops and art sessions, Remember Me represents the importance of understanding every individual living with dementia for who they are and respecting their individuality. Delivered by Age UK’s expert trainers, who draw upon years of frontline experience, the programme is taught via five foundation modules. Topics covered in the programme include effective communication, emotional well-being and daily living assistance. It has been devised to provide care professionals with a better


understanding of the situations that might arise when caring for someone with dementia and how best to support older people with the condition.


Training can also be tailored to include Age UK’s Sense of Ageing programme, a unique module designed to help care workers understand the way physical ageing impacts on everyday life. Developed with gerontologists, the course uses an interactive workshop that provides participants with the chance to experience the physical effects of ageing and sensory impairment. Stimulated using special equipment, users get a first-hand experience of what it’s like when vision, hearing, touch, dexterity and communication skills decline.


Remember Me modules can be spread over time to suit business needs and can also be personalised to suit the needs of different care professionals and levels. Age UK Training can deliver sessions at one of 13 specialised training centres based across the UK or, alternatively, participants can undertake training at a venue of their choice.


www.ageuk.org.uk


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