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FEATURE


with it. I am feeling pretty good which I hope will continue and I will make the best of the temporary new life style.


Being alone most of the time does not worry me as I still have plenty to keep me occupied. And it is no use worrying. Everything has been so uncertain for so long that a little more uncertainty will do no harm.


MONDAY 26TH OCTOBER 2020 Recovering in hospital


Seven months ago, coronavirus cast a cloud of uncertainty and fear over the world, affecting the lives of billions of people. Despite all the efforts the cloud still hangs over us.


My life changed again when I was one of eight Sunrise residents tested positive and I obviously wondered what form it would take.


For the first week or so, it wasn’t so serious. It was like having a bad cold. But then I started feeling much worse, with nausea,


"It is no use worrying. Everything has been so uncertain for so


long that a little more uncertainty will do no harm."


swings from being too cold and too hot, sleeplessness and even delusions. A fall in the bathroom early one morning proved disastrous. I was rescued by two carers who got me back into bed via a hoist. My condition worsened and I was taken to hospital with a broken ankle as well as coronavirus.


Aſter three weeks in hospital and some very difficult days the nursing and treatment is now working. Progress was slow until a few days ago when I was given some new tablets to stop the pain and enable me to sleep. There was an immediate effect. I asked for an increase and there was a remarkable effect. The pain is less than for months, I can get out of bed and am starting to walk again and manage to look aſter myself. What a difference from being helpless and reliant upon others.


CHRISTMAS DAY 2020 A Christmas like no other


Christmas Day. A day so different this year from any other. A strange day, with most of us missing the usual family gathering, and millions with no family, unable even to give their elderly parents a hug. A day to remember, and to forget.


My day started with Christmas greetings by Zoom from Robert, Karen and Owen (plus dog Rufus), all three resplendent in Christmas jumpers, Owen’s a spectacular Welsh one. Nadolig Llawen.


twitter.com/TomorrowsCare


I was sporting my first ever Christmas bow tie. Aſter trying to tie it for nearly an hour last night one of the carers managed it in a minute this morning. Then it was downstairs for the get together and to receive our giſts from Sunrise. I was patient, opening my presents under my Christmas tree mid-morning.


The festively dressed carers and Sunrise team were as cheerful as ever, making it another happy day although I would love to see those masks and visors removed.


But thank you, everyone, you made it a special day, again. FRIDAY 22ND


JANUARY 2021 Vaccination Day


It’s vaccination day at Sunrise. A day of relief, and celebration. Mass vaccination.


As usual, the care home got it right. Organised to the minute. Calm and relaxed, just right for us old people. And, a happy touch, flags and balloons to cheer us - a bright idea. Having a jab is never fun but today it was relished, welcomed with open arms.


The troops were on parade, with our sticks, walking aids, wheelchairs, ready and willing. The long wait was over. When the call came, we went into the temporary surgery, rolled up our sleeves. It was over in a flash. I did not feel a thing. Then into a lounge for a rest and a glass of orange juice. To mark the historic day, we had our pictures taken and then it was time for lunch, happy that a milestone in the long, arduous pandemic road pointed the pathway to safety.


Well done, Sunrise, and the NHS! WEDNESDAY 10TH


Freedom in sight


Sitting looking out of my window onto the sunlit street below, the world looks inviting. Normal. Not exciting. People driving cars and vans, riding bicycles, pushing prams, jogging, walking. Across the road a man is working in his garden. Beyond, I see the lighting towers of the university training ground.


A typical suburban scene on a typical aſternoon, but it is deceptive. Almost a mirage. I cannot go out to join it. Like countless millions throughout the world, I am a prisoner in my own home. Trapped. For a year, because of the plague stalking our planet, creating a living horror story.


The world has seen many fanatical leaders, dictators and despots who have held their subjects in thrall, but this is Britain in the 21st century, beacon of democracy. Over 60 million of us can no longer call our lives our own. Leaders have changed the rules and laws. Unlike heroes of the past, we have not rebelled, risen up in anger to break the chains. We have agreed with our leaders, followed their dictats and changed our whole way of life - voluntarily.


But freedom is nigh. Human ingenuity, courage and patience are winning the battle. Apprehension and danger receding, we hope we face only a few more months of isolation before we will be free to resume normal lives.


And I will happily ride my scooter out onto Cyncoed Road and rejoin the real world out there.


- 45 - MARCH 2021


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