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dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

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orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
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to authorised users only, all in real time.


3. Defect reporting – due to the working at height element of their jobs, many window cleaning companies have become specialist organisations working in a niche market and have been able to diversify into more technical reporting of building and site issues. Technology has played a significant part in this where ‘the difficult bit’ is gaining access to difficult areas and the reporting is provided by the technology and various pieces of software.


4. Safety logging – PPE and other equipment checks, near miss reporting, equipment handover sheets, weather checks and all manner of safety checking and recording can be done remotely and stored securely in real time.


5. Detailed recording – it is now becoming the norm to record activity in many service environments using Near Field Communication (NFC) tags or Quick Response (QR) codes. These tags are everywhere in our modern world and they are becoming more commonly seen in window cleaning. By scanning an NFC or QR tag at the top and bottom of a cradle drop, for example, data can be sent to a portal so that a visual of the building drop changes colour at the start and again at the end of the drop, giving the date and start and completion time of each drop. This is especially useful for very large sites where weather and equipment can play a part in scheduling, and where recording of which areas have been done and when is useful and relevant. Or for remote sites where it can provide evidence of attendance or completion.


www.tomorrowscleaning.com


There are a number of systems available for this kind of data collection and some service providers are creating their own, so they can make it relevant to their business and specific to individual client requirements.


The technology being used is not particularly new but what is new is how it is being applied to the window cleaning industry. A small thing like a local weather and windspeed app may seem a very simple thing, but this and the many apps available via the internet provide all window cleaners with vital tools for planning work so that it can be provided safely and on time.


What next for technology in window cleaning? There is a move from Europe in particular towards mechanical working at height cleaning systems, but currently they remain expensive and are mainly suitable for cleaning flat surfaces and aren’t able to cope with the many challenges presented by the architectural designs of modern buildings today. They do however have the benefit of reducing labour costs and potentially reducing safety concerns.


Can it be long before we regularly see drone technology developing to an extent where flying machines are frequently seen cleaning the windows above our streets? With current security concerns it would seem unlikely, especially as the technology seems to have some way to go. It is clear though that our industry is adept at keeping pace with changing client and site demands, and will react and adapt to the technological and competitive changes which it faces – as it has always done.


www.principlecleaning.com WINDOW CLEANING & WORKING AT HEIGHT | 51


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