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and they are still not being recognised for the hard work that they are doing every day. The wellbeing of staff and teachers is just as important to safeguard. We should invest in them, train them and make them feel supported.


If schools outsource this support, it’s up to the service provider to be malleable enough to lead this kind of initiative. Some schools have in-house solutions, meaning that they employ cleaners directly. However, it is advised that schools reach out to external cleaning companies who are available to provide valuable advice to those who need it.


This could also be an opportunity for education facilities to look at why they don’t outsource their cleaning and for them to look at the alternatives available in the market. Having a professional service that backs staff and gives them the right training or support is vital. Schools are not experts in cleaning: they are there to educate, as well as look after their teachers and students.


Controlling main contact points


When asked what the highest contact points are for schools, most people would claim it’s the classrooms, but in fact it’s the bathrooms. With this in mind, cleaning and sanitisation should be a frequent service when these areas are being used throughout the day.


For example, when students are going to the bathroom, they touch the taps to clean their hands, and even touch toilet seats. But how do you stop contamination if you’re not sanitising those areas regularly? It’s important to have sanitisation services and practices in place to reduce the risk of bacteria growing and to limit cross-contamination.


Furthermore, if humans are the main carrier of the COVID-19 virus and it’s spread through bodily liquids and fluids, bathrooms will most likely have the highest degree of infection probability. This is why schools should consider permanent cleaning services, round the clock, to support those high-risk areas. Ultimately, that is the cost of reducing the spread of infection.


www.tomorrowscleaning.com


There is no fast rule for each school, and cleaning services should work with the community environment that they find themselves in and approach it pragmatically. This involves working step by step and identifying the school’s main contact points to reduce the risk of transmission. This will naturally bring better hygiene practice and decrease cross contamination within small bubbles of students.


Education facilities have a responsibility to help educate their staff and students in hygiene best practices, and this will massively disrupt the cycle of infection as well as reduce sickness and absences from schools moving forward.


“Having a professional service


that backs staff and gives them the right training or support is vital.”


If we all washed our hands more regularly – all of us, not just those in schools – we would have a material impact on limiting cross-contamination. This is where the schools can support, providing that practical education and ensuring guidelines are adhered to.


www.ecocleen.co.uk EDUCATIONAL AND SCHOOL FACILITIES | 45


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