search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Keeping schools COVID-19 safe


Liam Mynes, from Tork manufacturer Essity, looks at successful models in other countries and discusses the role played by hand hygiene in enhancing school safety.


After being closed for more than two months, the tentative reopening of UK schools began in June. Opinion was sharply divided about the viability of schools opening up for part of the summer term, with some parents vowing to keep their children at home to ensure their safety.


With exams cancelled and the academic year disrupted on an epic scale in any case, it was questionable whether or not a great deal of schoolwork could be achieved in the last few weeks of term. But schools will almost definitely return in earnest in September, virus or no virus, and since the threat of COVID-19 is an ongoing one, staff and pupils must prepare for the ‘new norm’ in the education sector.


However, social distancing is difficult enough to achieve for us adults. So how can we expect young children and boisterous teenagers to cope with the need to keep two metres away from each other at all times?


Pupils have already returned to school in many other countries worldwide with various methods being employed to keep students and teachers safe.


Among the first nations to reopen its primary schools and nurseries was Denmark, where a system of micro-groups, or ‘bubbles’, has been adopted. These are small groups of around 12 pupils who are all taught by the same teacher. They are expected to arrive at school at the same time, eat lunch together and stay in their own zone in the playground to avoid them having to mix with other other bubbles.


The Netherlands was another country where the schools reopened early with pupils being invited to attend for half the week and spend the rest of the week learning from home. Like the Danish, the Dutch have chosen to teach children in sub-groups with designated areas set aside for


38 | EDUCATIONAL AND SCHOOL FACILITIES the teacher in each classroom to aid social distancing.


In Germany it was the older students who returned to school first. Besides implementing stringent social distancing rules, they have introduced one-way systems in school corridors and are staggering break times.


However, social distancing is only one means of defence against COVID-19. As the advice has stated all along, rigorous attention also needs to be paid to hand hygiene in order to keep us all safe.


The coronavirus can be transferred to objects and surfaces by an infected person, and this can quickly lead to cross- contamination. So, a thorough surface cleaning regime coupled with frequent handwashing is key to reducing the risk of coronavirus.


The schools that reopened early have recognised this. For example, German schools have imposed stricter cleaning regimes while pupils are required to clean their hands and desks each time they enter or leave a classroom. Meanwhile, handwashing in Danish schools is being enforced practically every hour. However, this has brought new problems in the form of skin irritation and eczema on the part of the children, due to the frequent hand cleansing.


Another potential issue concerning washing the hands more often than usual is the length of time the task takes to execute. According to the accepted advice, a thorough hand wash should take around 20 seconds – and when multiple students are washing their hands regularly this will eat up many precious minutes of the school day. Steps should therefore be taken to improve the efficiency of hand washing and drying where possible.


twitter.com/TomoCleaning


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90