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NEWS EDUCATION


CPMG designs Secondary Academy in Birmingham for 1,150 pupils


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Photography © Willmott Dixon


Christ Church, Church of England Secondary Academy is due to welcome pupils from September, having been completed to create an additional 1,150 school places for the region, to a design by CPMG Architects.


Delivered by contractor Willmott Dixon, the new £19m, three-storey school includes facilities to accommodate 900 secondary level pupils, and a further 250 students in the sixth form. The new building comprises a pick-up and drop-off area for pupils, a sports hall, two full size football pitches and one FA standard 3G pitch. Traditional materials have been used “in a contemporary manner to create a clean and simple aesthetic,” said the architects, whilst providing ease of maintenance. These include a concrete raft ground floor, traditional brick and block wall construction, and feature render and facade cladding to express the academy’s identity.


The school has been constructed through the Department for Education framework and has been designed to be “both elegant and sophisticated, using robust and durable materials


that will stand the test of time.” Sara Harraway, director at CPMG Architects, said: “We worked very closely with the school while developing the design, establishing a design concept based around the Trust’s values and the school’s branding. This has seen the introduction of a neutral colour palette, interspersed with bursts of signature blue and yellow feature elements.”


She continued: “The finished school has created a positive, bright, robust, attractive and nurturing environment for pupils, which will also promote a sense of calm and sophistication. Large, high windows have been integrated to optimise natural daylight – just one of many elements designed to promote positive wellbeing in all the building’s users.”


ADF AUGUST 2021 WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


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