search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
PROJECT REPORT: HEALTHCARE BUILDINGS


21


remain discreet from its immediate residential neighbourhood. The architect’s brief included the need to make the most of the prospect towards the east, to the valley. The building’s spine was therefore placed along the north-south axis, following the ridgeline and same axis of the house and its walled garden – the latter being brought into the landscape scheme as a place for staff to gain some respite between shifts.


The team also utilised the sloping topography by dropping all the services of the building, including an energy centre, logistics and servicing, to a lower floor level than the hospital's main zones. The landscape parkland extends right up to the base of the building on the western side – where the wards look across the landscape to distant views across the valley. On the eastern side the site has been cut to accommodate the logistics and primary energy plant. This is tucked away behind the treeline, so is “not evident in distant views into the site,” says the architect.


Circulation Heading inside, the architect explains the “very simple” circulation routes, with visitors always traversing north-south along the ground floor axis. Moving from the entrance, the design leads visitors to the ward accommodation – avoiding the diagnostic and treatment patient flows – via the visitor lifts which exit into inpatient


ADF AUGUST 2021


visitor lounges, from where they can be escorted to their relatives. According to the architect, this routing was decided early on: “There are very critically ill patients who will likely journey backwards and forwards from the inpatient zone to the diagnostic and treatment zone several times a day for various interventions, and we wanted to avoid that crossflow between visitors and inpatient movement.” As such, the hospital streets on the upper levels – where the inpatient wards and the diagnostic and treatment zones are located – are exclusively for bed and trolley traffic. “That’s really good from both a privacy and a dignity point of view,” says Hitchcock. It also simplifies things for staff; “You haven’t got the complication of visitors looking for destinations in what is a clinical zone.”


Separating functions


Unlike more common hospital typologies, where differing zones are split vertically in a tower and podium solution, the building’s three separated zones, inpatient care, diagnostics, and treatment, have been stacked ward on top of ward, all leading from different parts of the central axis. “In this configuration,” explains Adrian,


“there’s an interdependency from the outset between the design of the different zones, their superstructures, and the engineering and services work behind them.” He adds: “While atypical, building each section of a


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


“We wanted to avoid that crossflow between visitors and inpatient movement”


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68