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INSULATION 55


THE SUSTAINABLE CASE FOR PIR


Simon Blackham of Recticel Insulation explores why the sustainability benefits of PIR make it a great choice for smart, energy efficient homes.


P


olyisocyanurate (PIR) insulation panels satisfy two crucial factors for designing effective insulation


solutions for new and existing buildings: low thermal conductivity, and durable performance. Such properties have led to them becoming the go-to solution for housebuilders in search of a durable, higher-performance alternative to mineral or glass wool to create healthy,


comfortable interiors which are cost-effective to maintain.


ENDURING BENEFITS According to the Insulation Manufacturers Association (IMA), the average UK household spends around £1,230 on fuel bills each year, which can be up to 50 per cent more than necessary due to the lack of energy-saving measures being implemented in the home.


Poorly-insulated building fabric is


a major contributor to domestic energy wastage. To help combat this, the construction industry is increasingly turning to PIR. There are numerous key benefits


associated with PIR insulation. Its closed-cell structure means it doesn’t absorb water, allowing the thermal performance and reliability of the product to be retained over time.


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