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4 INDUSTRY NEWS


FROM THE EDITOR


From rising unaffordability to a low supply of homes and skilled workers, housing is in crisis in the UK, and has been for some time.


Jack Wooler


This year, house prices rose to eight times the average salary from four times in the 90s; over half of UK construction firms are struggling to hire tradesmen; more recently the cost of building work on UK homes is set to rise as the price of materials has soared; and finally, the climate crisis is now well underway.


Meanwhile, the number of new homes built is still under the Government’s (arguably insufficient) target of 300,000 a year, and this is without the looming environmental goals that mean homes will not only need to be built faster, but better – with the aim of bringing UK emissions to net zero by 2050.


The upcoming Future Homes Standard for example is set to bring stringent – and absolutely necessary – changes to our built environment to help deliver on our carbon aims, focusing on a ‘fabric-first’ approach. It will however bring a host of challenges to builders, especially those who are not accustomed to the implementation of low-carbon heating or such high levels of air tightness – as well as pricing these features in.


Though controversial, the sweeping planning changes announced in the recent Queen’s Speech have the potential to help sustain the pace of building in spite of these challenges – the reforms being described as “the biggest overhaul of England’s planning system in 70 years.”


ON THE COVER


Brian Berry says SMEs need to be placed at the heart of the Government’s green building agenda


05.21


HOUSEBUILDER & DEVELOPER


We have recently undertaken a survey, working with research consultants Edge Insight, on industry perceptions of offsite methods. It revealed that housebuilders and developers believe offsite technologies could positively impact many of the issues listed above – particularly speed, cost and skills.


Despite the technologies’ long history of success, the understanding of its benefits, and its relevance to these issues shown in our data, there were still some 40 per cent of respondents who as yet haven’t engaged directly with MMC, and 37 per cent of these don’t intend to.


PASSIVHAUS FOR THE PEOPLE Housing association Hanover (Scotland) launches its first Passivhaus scheme for social


housing near Loch Lomond, offering 15 households a way to avoid fuel poverty


Hanover (Scotland), Drymen, go to page 36


WWW.HBDONLINE.CO.UK


Covered in-depth on page 23 of this issue, our Exploring Current thinking On Modern Methods of Construction report highlights the biggest benefits of MMC for builders and developers, as well as its long gestation in the industry. It also poses the question to our readers: if they believe MMC can address the industry’s issues, what’s stopping its adoption across the board?


Jack Wooler, deputy editor


Energy consultant Harry Hinchcliffe on the ins and outs of the new Standard Assessment Procedure


Pelham Homes’ waterside scheme in Nottingham is shortlisted for national award


Splitting the country into Growth, Protection and Regeneration zones, the intention is to allow more new homes to be built on the right kind of land. The planning system has arguably been the most prominent complaint among housebuilders and developers in England in recent years, so any easing will be welcome to many. Some however believe planning has become something of a scapegoat for wider industry issues, and the Government’s heavy-handedness in its introduction of the new zones has also proved controversial.


Besides planning, one potential route to maintaining the pace towards tackling the above issues – and one that has been argued for by many in the industry for over 100 years now – puts Modern Methods of Construction (MMC) front and centre.


HOUSEBUILDER & DEVELOPER


Publisher Anthony Parker


Managing Editor James Parker


Deputy Editor Jack Wooler


Editorial Assistant Roseanne Field


Studio Manager Mikey Pooley


Production Assistants Georgia Musson Kimberley Musson


Account Manager Sheehan Edmonds


Sales Executive Steve Smith


PR Executives Suzanne Easter Kim Friend


Audience Development Manager Jane Spice


Managing Director Simon Reed


Cointronic House, Station Road, Heathfield, East Sussex TN21 8DF


Advertising & administration Tel: 01435 863500 info@netmagmedia.co.uk www.hbdonline.co.uk


Editorial features Tel: 01435 863500 jparker@netmagmedia.co.uk


Press releases editorial@netmagmedia.co.uk


The manufacturer of the paper used within our publication is a Chain-of- Custody certified supplier operating within environmental systems certified to both ISO 14001 and EMAS in order to ensure sustainable production.


Subscription costs just £48 for 12 issues, including post and packing. Phone 01435 863500 for details. Individual copies of the publication are available at £5 each inc p & p.


All rights reserved


No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, me- chanical, including photocopying, recording or stored in any information retrieval system without the express prior written consent of the publisher. Although every effort is made to ensure the accuracy and reliability of material published in Housebuilder & Developer, the publisher can accept no responsibility for the claims or opinions made by contributors, manufacturers or advertisers. Editorial contributors to this journal may have made a payment towards the reproduction costs of material used to illus- trate their products.


Printed in England


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