search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
EXPLORING CURRENT THINKING IN OFFSITE 33


struggling to hire bricklayers, and 59 per cent are struggling to hire carpenters and joiners. One of the reasons behind this is the industry’s ageing workforce, and the lack of attraction for younger workers. The Construction Industry Training Board (CITB) has reported that the overall appeal of the construction industry as a career for young people is lacking – scoring 4.2 out of 10 among 14 to 19 year olds. It is said to be perceived as “unacademic,” “dangerous,” as well as “outdoors and dirty.” Modular construction – particularly the elements


performed in factory conditions – reduce the “outdoors and dirty” elements to virtually nothing, and BIM-based factory designs can be created from essentially anywhere – a scenario likely to be more attractive to a generation used to working with computers. It is also easy to understand how safety can be improved under factory conditions. Only 14 per cent of respondents cited skills as one of their


top three benefits to building offsite, and 21 per cent safety – suggesting they are not considered among modular’s defining benefits – however, 79 per cent reported that the skills crisis could be positively affected by modular technologies.


EFFICIENCY, ENVIRONMENTAL AND WASTE The climate crisis is undoubtedly upon us, and the construction industry has a major role to play, with the Government estimating that the construction, operation and maintenance of the built environment accounts for 45 per cent of total UK carbon emissions. Two of the largest carbon offenders in construction are the energy use of homes and the wastage involved in constructing homes. According to the Housing, Communities and Local Government Committee, modular construction uses 20-30 per cent less energy than traditional methods, and offsite manufacturing wastage is reportedly less than 2 per cent. In the controlled environments that modular factories offer,


human error can be reduced, waste can be minimised, and precision engineering can reduce the performance gap between designs and the building in operation. Such precision can also reduce air-leakage within the new building, and factory assembly can significantly reduce onsite air as well as noise pollution. Materials can be ordered to exact specifications, and there is a lower risk of onsite spoilage through wet weather and other environmental causes, all leading to environmental savings as there is less wastage across the board. When it came to efficiency, these benefits were fairly well understood – with 54 per cent of respondents citing efficiency as one of their top three benefits to building offsite, and 31 per cent environmental benefits.


CONCLUDING SUMMARY


It is clear that housebuilding in the UK is suffering multiple crises at once, from rising costs, to low supply and a lack


of skilled tradesmen, and all the while prices are rising – with both builders and buyers suffering. Our research has shown that housebuilders and developers


are aware that modern methods of construction have the potential to address each of these to some degree, with respondents reinforcing the message that higher speed, lower costs, and higher precision are the biggest benefits – all of which are able to directly combat some of the sector’s most pressing concerns. Despite the positives, the survey results have revealed that there are still some 40 per cent of builders who have never used any form of ‘modern methods’ whatsoever – and 37 of those never anticipate doing so. The data displayed many causes behind this, and the biggest barriers for our readers were the initial cost and a lack of confidence from buyers. Conversely, the majority of respondents agreed that they could save money by building offsite, and that it could help increase affordability for buyers. The data implies that making the change to achieve greater takeup is in the Government’s hands to some degree, with 63 per cent of respondents saying there is not enough support from Government to help the industry adopt modular technologies. And, in terms of perception – with MMC’s image improving vastly in previous decades – it may be time that’s needed for specifiers’ opinions to change. Still, while MMC is no silver bullet for the industry’s problems, this report has shown that builders believe it has the potential to ease some of sector’s most pressing issues, more builders than not have begun to use the technologies to some degree, and the perception of offsite building has improved across the board in the last five years. If housebuilders and developers are looking for ways to innovate and save time and money, and the Government wants to meet its targets, perhaps those who haven’t should take a fresh look on modern methods of construction.


Report text compiled by Jack Wooler, deputy editor at Housebuilder & Developer


FOR A FULL VERSION OF THIS SURVEY PLEASE VISIT WWW.HBDONLINE.CO.UK TO DOWNLOAD THE WHITE PAPER


SURVEY SPONSORS


We are grateful to our six survey sponsors for their participation in this White Paper report:


AQUARIAN CLADDING SYSTEMS GLIDEVALE PROTECT ITW CONSTRUCTION PRODUCTS OFFSITE MITEK ROCKWOOL SCOTFRAME


PRODUCED IN ASSOCIATION WITH


WWW.HBDONLINE.CO.UK


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68