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TRAINING


Leadership and management for the new world


Are you a leader or a manager, and does it really matter? The definitions are not important, but the ability to engage and enthuse others – and to ensure the collective efforts create value within the organisation – is important. Stuart McCord (pictured) – a management training consultant at Challenge Consulting, which delivers the Chamber’s Manager Development Programme – explains what’s required of the modern day manager.


THE ‘ACCIDENTAL MANAGER’ Often, talent is spotted within a


technical discipline, related to the organisation’s core purpose and, as a result of being both technically competent and committed, the individual is promoted to a line management role. Whether they are titled as a manager, team leader or supervisor, the dilemma is the same. They may have spent many years


honing their skills in their technical competence, yet overnight they find themselves required to exhibit a whole new set of competencies – those which rely on being able to set objectives for others, measure performance, communicate (often now at a distance), solve problems and make decisions on cross- department issues, and often manage budgets to boot. They are no longer responsible


just for themselves; they now have a duty of care to others and that responsibility weighs heavy, particularly to less experienced managers. In addition, being measured not


just on your own performance in your technical discipline, but relying on the wider achievements of the team is a tough call for


problem-solving and to encourage others to question and challenge the status quo


• To enable a culture of creativity and innovation where change is embraced rather than feared.


The new world of work, with management at a distance, adds an extra layer of complexity. There is, however, help at hand.


Managers will need to communicate effectively with remote teams in a post-Covid world


many, and the balance between trust and control is a real dilemma.


LEARNING YOUR CRAFT The ability to manage and lead others in the right way requires, like all skilled roles, to be developed over time. The list of areas to consider to truly excel within a management role are notoriously broad, but some of the most common areas cited are: • To communicate a clear and consistent set of values that create an inclusive culture and encourages others to contribute openly and share ideas


• To set and maintain direction, and communicate a compelling vision that others can understand and buy into


• To organise and allocate work at a distance, setting clear targets for teams and individuals to enable recognition and celebration, while highlighting areas for development or corrective actions


• To manage resources to ensure both efficiency and effectiveness to drive up profitability and value through the business


• To identify opportunities for improvement through joint


TRAINING COURSES HELP TRANSITION INTO MANAGEMENT The Chamber offers a wide range of one and two-day management and leadership training, which will support those who find they need extra tools in their kit bag in these challenging times and where there are gaps in one or two of the areas set out above. The full suite of support is also offered via the six- part Managers Development Programme. For those who are in more senior positions, and where a more strategic view is required, the 10-session Director Development Programme is also available.


For more information about the various training courses, visit www.emc-dnl.co.uk/developing-skills


Learning how to lead your team from home


Learning how to lead teams virtually will be a key focus of the next instalment of the Chamber’s Manager Development Programme. It will cover the key skills needed to be effective and


efficient in a management role, which also includes setting and monitoring objectives, coaching and communication skills for managers, identifying opportunities for improvement, and how to plan and implement change within an organisation. The programme will be delivered online by a trainer


from Challenge Consulting and runs for six half-day sessions, lasting between 1.30pm and 5pm, from Monday 25 January to Monday 8 March. Business training manager Vicki Thompson said: “As we ring in 2021, never before has it been so important


80 business network December 2020/January 2021


to have a management and leadership team that’s effective and efficient within their role. “Our Manager Development Programme was designed to support this essential group within every business, giving them the tools needed to manage the day-to-day requirements of their roles, along with areas such as managing performance, innovation, coaching and supporting change, to name but a few. “We have also redesigned the course to support with


remote management and the ever-changing requirements of dealing with issues online rather than face to face.”


The Manager Development Programme costs £750 + VAT for members and £1,050 + VAT for non-members. For more information, visit bit.ly/336mJBJ


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