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92 EXTERNAL ENVELOPE


Sika Sarnafil protects UK’s first dedicated centre for stroke and dementia research


S


ika Sarnafil’s single ply roofing membrane has been installed on the UK’s first dedicated centre for


stroke and dementia research at the University of Oxford, providing a long lasting waterproofing solution for this impressive building. The Wolfson Building is situated on the University’s John Radcliffe Hospital site and provides purpose-built facilities for the Wolfson Centre for the Prevention of Stroke and Dementia (CPSD), as well as research space for the Wellcome Centre for Integrative Neuroimaging (WIN). Offering expansive views of the city and its surroundings, the new neuroscience research building’s H-shape floor plan was designed to symbolise the two departments’ collaborative relationship. When it came to the roof, the facility required a robust and fully integrated waterproofing system that would accommodate roof penetrations, walkway and PV requirements.


and straightforward maintenance, the client insisted it be used again. Sarnafil G410 12 ELF in Lead Grey along


Sika Sarnafil, the UK’s leading single ply


roofing manufacturer, was specifically requested for the project by the University of Oxford and came on board during the early design stages to help Oxford-based architect firm fjmt with the specification. Sarnafil’s single ply membrane has been


used across many of the University’s existing buildings, including the Department of Chemistry’s new Teaching Laboratories. Highly regarded by the educational establishment for its ease of use, robustness


Nordic Copper by Rail D


esigned in a crisp contemporary style, new additions to a 19th


century terraced house backing onto a


railway embankment in south London give a nod to local heritage through dark materiality, with Nordic Brown pre-oxidised copper alongside charred timber cladding. The project – designed by Michael


Collins Architect LLP – involved extensive refurbishment of the original house and new extensions to the rear, conceived as two cubic volumes embedded within a plinth. The language of the new extension was inspired by the honesty and simple poetry of self-built 'add-ons' seen along the rear of railway terraces. One, copper-clad, volume creates a tall central 'lantern' over the dining area and is detached from the rear of the property to allow light to enter from all sides. The choice of materials was informed


by a robust environmental agenda but also inspired by the location, as Michael Collins explained: ‘There is a charm to the aged sootiness of the London stock brickwork facing the old railway. We wanted the


with Sarnavap HD were chosen to weathertight the concrete slab room. Due to an uneven and rough surface, a system had to be specified that would overcome this problem. Roofing contractor Vertec liaised with Sika Sarnafil and opted to mechanically fix the single ply to overcome this. Further challenges were found due to the multiple penetrations in the roof, numbering over 50, including cables, pipework and ducting. Opting to box them in, all penetrations were successfully sealed thanks to expert workmanship from Vertec’s Sika Sarnafil-trained installers. With support from Sika Sarnafil, who


oversaw the project and offered advice and knowledge throughout, Vertec was able to get the roof weatherproofed on schedule.


01707 394444 gbr.sika.com


cladding to relate to this historic context and the changing finish of Nordic Brown pre- oxidised copper alludes to the age of steam. ‘Through previous experience, we have


been impressed by copper’s longevity, resistance to moisture and ability to tackle sharp details without venting. We were also interested in its sustainability credentials and ability to be continuously recycled. Nordic Brown copper was used for the roof coverings and facades, and pre-weathered Nordic Brass was applied to the glazing reveals, which take on a golden hue and stand out in the light. Brass was also used for the kitchen splashbacks and these different forms of copper blend well together, giving a real sense of continuity inside and out’. The extensive Nordic Copper range of architectural copper products is available from Aurubis, part of the world’s leading integrated copper group and largest copper recycler.


01875 812 144 www.nordiccopper.com


Photo: Jacob Milligan Photo: Michael Collins Architect


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


ADF NOVEMBER 2020


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