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14 NEWS RESIDENTIAL


Great Gransden development offers commuter idyll


Woods Hardwick Architects have worked alongside housebuilder Hayfield Homes to deliver a development in the Cambridgeshire village of Great Gransden which will offer families the opportunity to live in a rural village commutable to central London. Accessed off Sand Road, Hayfield


Avenue comprises 40 new residences whose design is influenced by the Arts and Crafts era. A strong village community has seen Great Gransden previously win the Campaign for the Protection of Rural England’s Best Kept Village competition. The area is highly sought-after due to its schooling, local amenities and historic buildings, including the oldest remaining post mill in England.


For the off-plan launch the


housebuilder has produced a large scale model of the new scheme which will enable interested parties to take a closer


The area is highly sought-after due to its schooling, local amenities and historic buildings, including the oldest remaining post mill in England


look at the site layout and various house designs.


Construction work is said to be progressing well at the 4.4-acre site, where a linear route is being created through the development, which has inspired the


Hayfield Avenue name. The architects took “specific design cues” from Arts and Crafts properties in the village. A total of nine house styles will feature across the development, giving a choice of two, three, four and five-bedroom homes. ‘Play Streets’ will be incorporated within the centre of the scheme, which will see the road surface designated as an area for cars and pedestrians to share.


Todd Architects gets mixed use consent in Belfast MIXED USE


Todd Architects has won planning permission for Bedford Yard, an aparthotel and office development in Belfast City centre, on a site opposite the BBC's Ormeau Avenue headquarters in the city.


By refurbishing a vacant four-storey red brick former warehouse and adding a new-build structure behind, the landmark development will deliver around 10,000 ft2


of lettable office space plus a 132- room hotel. Working with client Andras House Ltd, the architects’ design will add a new high- rise building to Belfast's commercial core while “securing and enhancing the appearance of the Victorian terrace that sits within the city's historic Linen Conservation Area,” said the architects. The refurbishment and transformation


of the warehouse will create two new ground floor restaurants with Grade A office accommodation above. An open-air courtyard will be located


between the existing terrace and proposed aparthotel, accessed through a gated opening that harks back to traditional Belfast ‘entries.’


The 13-storey aparthotel will offer panoramic views from upper floors, over the City Hall, Gasworks, Dublin Road and through to the Belfast Hills. Commenting on the design, Andrew Murray at Todd Architects, said: "The aparthotel’s mix of solid panels and glass has been balanced to create a light feeling building without becoming a ‘glass box’.” He added: “The building’s form has been carved and cut back to respect neighbouring frontages and reduce its


visual impact. Horizontal banding on each floor adds gravitas, whilst ethereal glazed panels encase the top floors.” The colour palette – an ombre effect in muted bronze – “helps sit the new building sympathetically beside the redbrick terrace, nearby listed buildings and the wider Linen Conservation Area.”


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ADF NOVEMBER 2020


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