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44 PROJECT REPORT: HOTELS, RESTAURANTS & BARS


of this strongly expressed diagonal structure, and the cantilevers, which echo other Sheppard Robson buildings in the area (3 Hardman Street, and 1, the Avenue, which is tenanted by Armani, and has a 27 metre cantilever). Allen-Burt says that in designing an exposed external structure, it’s important to “work very closely” with the structural engineers (in this case Engenuiti), otherwise the facade can “become a structural solution rather than an architectural one.”


The building has no front or back, being ‘very much an island,” and addressing this challenge fed into the notion of creating a trellis-like exposed frame to make a visual statement; the decision to give it “more of a colonial feel” as a pavilion, redolent of buildings in the Far East, was driven by the client, says Allen-Burt, but the practice’s key ambition to expose the timber, and solve how it would weather, was a challenge. “When we first pitched the idea, I remember saying to their chief executive, I don’t know whether we can build this yet. We’ve done lots of timber buildings, but not quite like this. But they were extremely supportive.”


The idea behind the 700 mm deep multi- layered facade was to “contrast with the surrounding buildings, which are largely single skin with small amounts of solar shading,” says Allen-Burt.


The horizontal and vertical exposed larch glulam elements provide a good amount of shading, but the architects wanted to enhance this, while also facilitating landscape growing up and across the building. So a metal trellis was designed, in front of the darkened timber cladding, with further timber slats positioned within it. Onto this structure is mounted GRP planters with laser cut anodised aluminum faces, which sit on the projecting floor edges. This enables a high volume of planting to combine with the trellis as the final visual layer of the facade, producing bands of green running across the building. There are also gabion boxes hanging underneath floor ledges for “trailing and hanging” plants, and a mesh between the trellis members for climbing plants. As well as offering further shading in summer months, the landscaping will provide “some disorder to what are very rigorous, ordered facades,” says the architect, “as if it started to overgrow the building.” To complement the natural feel, the architects wanted to avoid overt symmetry; which, with the building being eight structural bays long, was a risk. The


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You have to work very closely with engineers, otherwise it can become a structural solution, rather than an architectural one


flexibility provided by the multi-layered facade was exploited to both adjust to the changing window placements as the tenant decided on its internal arrangement, but also to offset the facade elements from the windows so that the metal meshes and timber louvres don’t line up precisely with the windows behind them. This disrupts any impression of the building being too orderly that might have resulted from what is a fairly simple underlying structure.


Interiors & roof terrace


The ground floor contains the Ivy Brasserie, with the first floor housing the ‘Dalton Room’ for private dining, kitchens and staff areas. The second floor has the Ivy Asia late-night bar and restaurant, complete with a bright green, illuminated stone floor. The Roof Garden is a separate restaurant, on an enclosed terrace added to the building’s three storeys.


The architects wanted the roof to have a considered design, as a “fifth elevation that’s looked down on,” and the final solution came late in the day. The architects suggested including a glazed, metal ‘orangery’ structure sitting within a timber trellis, “It was very important to me to keep it as honest to the original idea as possible.” The semi-external space has a retractable roof, but also has two canvas ‘boxes’ at either end, providing further dining space required by the client.


CLT & glulam The ‘stick’ glulam frame consists of columns and beams, on which sit 140 mm CLT floor slabs, supported by ribs. Due to this construction by manufacturer Stora Enso, the thickness of floor slabs can be reduced considerably, in this case to match the exposed external glulam beams. In addition, floor to ceiling heights are maximised, and a lighter weight overall structure is produced.


Thanks to the structural engineers suggesting this approach, the alternative of a “potential 200 mm thick CLT panel to span 6 metres was avoided,” says Allen- Burt. He adds that it’s “potentially a more


ADF NOVEMBER 2020


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