search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
74 STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS


rubber pad for impact reduction. The timbers are levelled using a combination of plastic packers and elevation blocks to offer flexibility in height adjustments, with the system designed to provide quick and easy installation.


Often there is a conflict between reducing impact sound through the slab, which by its very nature should have some flexibility, and the stiffness required for the use of brittle finishes such as large format ceramic or porcelain tiles. Extensive testing of the systems is required to provide specifiers, contractors and installers with the confidence that the system will perform, no matter what floor finish or acoustic performance is required in any given specification. With underfloor heating becoming more prevalent in many new building projects, floors of this nature are not just looked upon to level uneven floors.


Thermal benefits


The global climate crisis is rightly bringing energy efficiency into focus, and having proficient heating systems is just one small part of how we are constructing more environmentally friendly homes. This has seen a bigger call for overlay boards and floor finishes with low thermal resistance, ensuring a more responsive underfloor heating system that has greater controllability. Further aiding flexibility, the systems are designed so that incorporating an underfloor heating system and a high- density gypsum overlay board is simple. Installing insulation and diffuser plates in between the timber battens means the heat is transferred upwards with very little resistance from the overlay board meaning the heat is transferred into the room quicker. Heat transfer can cause its own issues however, with chipboards traditionally having high levels of expansion and contraction with changes of temperature. High-density gypsum boards do not have this issue, and so installing tiles, vinyls and wood flooring has never been easier.


Engaging with stakeholders As with any system, engaging with the stakeholders of the project is key to eliminating possible issues or time delays on site. Issues such as metal frame facades, high point loads for projects such as schools or hotels and fire detailing all have simple solutions if thought about from an early stage in the build process.


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


An acoustic cradle and batten system is quick to install, lightweight and accurate, and enables contractors to get the floors to within the nearest millimetre


A lot of the issues we see on sites using raised floor systems can be overcome very easily, however, it is critical that these are identified at an early stage so that we can work together to offer solutions. It may be as simple as bringing in the centres of the batten system for corridor areas or kitchens and bathrooms that typically experience higher loadings, but even the simplest solutions can seem trickier if they are dealt with ‘last minute.’


Case study


A recent project in London highlights many of the points discussed in this article. Over 12,000 m2


of acoustic cradle and batten


was installed, incorporating underfloor heating, with most of the floor finished with 600 x 1200 large format porcelain tiles. It was important on this project that consultation was undertaken with the architect, tile manufacturer and tile installer at an early stage to find a balance between the needs for acoustic performance while minimising deflection.


The system was rigorously tested at a UKAS accredited laboratory to confirm that the overall level of deflection met the stringent requirements from the customer. The flooring and underfloor


heating contactor were also engaged and trained with the improved acoustic system, and the installation incorporated a cantilever solution at the glazed facade which accommodated differing floor void heights, also requiring increased loading to kitchens and corridors. This did have an effect on how the underfloor heating zones were to be fitted, so again consultation prior to the start of the works was so important in order to maintain output and overcome potential snags before they happened.


Peter Rigby is key account and supply chain manager at Cellecta


ADF NOVEMBER 2020


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132