search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
70 STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS


Schöck Isokorb for seafront Passive House Award Winner


S


eaton is a traditional Devon seaside resort town, but the eye-catching new development on the seafront is anything


but traditional. Seaton Beach Apartments offers innovative, award-winning luxury beachfront apartments, complete with a penthouse – and is the first multi-residential development in the UK to be certified as passive house plus. The ground floor is concrete, with monolithic clay block construction used from the first to third floors and timber frame for the penthouse. Combined with high-performance external render and internal plaster, the result is an entirely mineral hygroscopic wall build-up, which helps regulate humidity and provide a comfortable internal environment.


Uses 90 per cent less energy Other features include low electromagnetic field wiring and a highly efficient mechanical ventilation system with heat recovery and exhaust air heat pump for hot water supply. There is constant filtered air within the triple glazed, airtight construction and PV roof panels generate more energy than the building uses – which is 90 per cent less energy usage than a typical new build. Because passive house standard is easier to achieve with simpler, box-like forms, buildings can be considered aesthetically limited. However, design ingenuity and the use of Schöck Isokorb thermally broken balcony connectors defies that notion. The potentially unexciting building now features


large sea-facing balconies with generous curves. The detailing of these balconies is critical though, if thermal bridging is to be minimised and the energy performance not compromised.


Front view of the apartments: “Dug Wilders Photography”


A technically advanced solution Schöck Isokorb thermal breaks are installed where the balconies meet the clay block structure. Ineffectual insulation at these cantilever connectivity points will result in local heat loss, requiring more energy to maintain the building’s internal temperature. Low internal surface temperatures around the thermal bridge can also cause condensation, leading to structural integrity problems with absorbent insulation products


and the potentially serious occurrence of mould growth. The Schöck Isokorb is one of the most technically advanced countermeasures against thermal bridging. It thermally separates components from one another and also acts in a structural design capacity. The product type used has an innovative HTE Compact compression module and transfers both negative moments and positive shear forces with cantilever balconies.


Enormous freedom of design As the leading international supplier of structural thermal breaks, Schöck is able to offer planners complete construction dependability and almost limitless freedom of design with the options available. There are solutions for concrete-to-concrete, concrete- to-steel, steel-to-steel, a thermally insulating connection for reinforced concrete walls – and even a maintenance free alternative to wrapped parapets. The temperature factor used to indicate condensation risk (fRSI) which must be greater than, or equal to, 0.75 for residential buildings, is easily met by incorporating the Isokorb. All products meet full compliance with the relevant UK building regulations and the NHBC. They also offer LABC Registration and have independent BBA Certification.


Dug Wilders Photography


01865 290 890 www.schoeck.co.uk


Dug Wilders Photography


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


ADF NOVEMBER 2020


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132