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SOLDER, FLUX & INSULATING PASTES


Conditions for use: Flux paste should be brushed onto the joint surfaces before assembly. Further flux should then be applied externally either side of the joint mouth.


It is good practice to mechanically clean and degrease the joint surface before applying flux. Heat slowly and evenly to the brazing temperature, without local overheating. Use the flux as a temperature guide - it will become opaque and may have some dark patches as brazing temperature is approached. If blackening of the flux occurs this is often a sign of insufficient flux, overheating or flux exhaustion.


Supplied: 500g Tub Code


C34153 Description Easy Flo Flux Paste


UOM Price £18.50


500G Price breaks available, see website Flux - Paste, Fluxite


Fluxite Soldering Paste - Flux “Fry” Fluxite is the most effective Flux Known • The quality soldering fluid clean – fast – economical


• An effective and reliable flux paste which simplifies soldering and lead jointing.


• Also suitable for lead-free and lead containing solder alloys


• We supply fist class solder to use with Fluxite Solder Paste code S33171. Solder copper brass pewter bronze zinc lead, tin and gilding metal


• Suitable for model makers, hobbies, crafts, arts, badge makers to name just a few users


Weight: 140g Contents: 100g


Code S33170 Description Fluxite Soldering Paste


UOM Price £8.45


100G Price breaks available, see website Flux - Powder, Borax


Borax Powder - Flux A flux commonly used when soldering jewellery. Our special form of borax is produced for use by jewellers, silversmiths, gold investment ingot makers, metal workers, etc.


• Our borax is easy to dissolve and melt than ordinary borax


• Add the flux with tap water to form a toothpaste consistency


• Apply on soldering joins ware necessary using fine brushes


• The flux to use when melting precious metals in an electric furnace or with a Sievert torch system


Supplied: 1kg Tub Code


C4360 Description Borax Flux Powder


UOM Price £4.25


1KG Price breaks available, see website Flux - Powder, Easi-Flo


Flux - Easi-Flo - Flux Powder Easy-floâ„¢ Flux Powder is Johnson Matthey’s leading brand brazing flux. It is sold widely throughout the world and is recognised as one of the best flux powders available. It is very fluid at the bottom end of its working range resulting in early and extensive flux


spread. This ensures that the joint surfaces are well protected from oxidation at the earliest possible point of the brazing operation. This high level of fluidity also helps to reduce flux voids/entrapment in the joint, the low viscosity of the flux aiding its displacement by the brazing filler metal from the joint gap.


Easy-Flo Flux Powder has a working range of 550-800 °C. It is most suitable for use with gold, silver, copper, copper alloys, brass, mild steel and stainless steel, but not aluminium soldering.


Flux - Powder, Tenacity 125 (for High Temperatures)


Tenacity 125 - Flux Powder - For High Temperatures - Flux


Johnson Matthey Metal Joining Tenacityâ„¢ No. 125 Flux Powder constantly evolves to meet the needs of its customers, of emerging technologies and of the environment it operates in.


Tenacityâ„¢ No.125 Flux Powder


is a high temperature flux that is effective on platinum, copper, copper based alloys, mild and low alloy steels and tungsten carbide with brazing filler metals melting between 750-1150 °C. Typically it would be used with specialized JM Bronzeâ„¢ or Argentelâ„¢ Alloys, particularly F-Bronze.


• Product uses: Tenacityâ„¢ No.125 Flux Powder is suitable for use on platinum, copper, copper based alloys, mild and low alloy steels and tungsten carbide.


• Conditions for use: The powder should be mixed with water and a few drops of a liquid detergent to form a paste which should then be brushed onto the joint surfaces before assembly. Further flux should then be applied externally either side of the joint mouth.


It is good practice to mechanically clean and degrease the joint surface before applying flux. Heat slowly and evenly to the brazing temperature, without local overheating.


If blackening of the flux occurs this is often a sign of insufficient flux, overheating or flux exhaustion.


How to use᷃


1. Mechanically clean and degrease the joint surface before applying flux


2. Mix flux powder with water and a few drops of liquid detergent to form a thick paste


3. Brush paste onto the joint surfaces before assembly and externally either side of the joint opening 4. Heat evenly to the brazing temperature, avoid localised overheating


5. If blackening of the component or flux occurs this is a sign of insufficient flux, overheating or flux exhaustion


6. The flux residues are insoluble in water and must be removed by mechanical methods such as filing abrasives and grit blasting


• Supplied: 400g Tub Code


C34452 Description Tenacity 125 Flux Powder


UOM Price £27.35


400G Price breaks available, see website


Syringe Solder 9ct, 18ct & Silver


Brazing is a metal-joining process whereby a filler metal is heated above and distributed between two or more close-fitting parts by capillary action. The filler metal is brought slightly above its melting (liquid US) temperature while protected by a suitable atmosphere, a flux. Then flows over the base metal (known as wetting) and is then cooled to join the work pieces together. It is similar to soldering, except the temperature used to melt the filler metal is above 450 °C.


Easy-Floâ„¢ Flux Powder has excellent ‘hot rodding’ characteristics and adheres well to a warmed brazing rod allowing flux to be transferred to the joint area via the rod. This characteristic has made Easy-Flo Flux Powder very popular in hand brazing operations where the time to produce a brazed component is crucial.


Clean and degrease the joint surfaces before applying flux.


Flux powder should be mixed with water and a few drops of liquid detergent to form a thick paste. Paste should then be brushed onto the joint surfaces before assembly. Further flux should then be applied externally on either side of the joint mouth.


Hot Rodding is where a warm brazing rod is dipped into flux powder and the flux adhering to the rod is transferred to the joint area. This is an effective fluxing method but difficult to achieve good penetration of capillary joints. It can be used to supplement a pre- fluxed area during heating.


It is good practice to mechanically clean and degrease the joint surface before applying flux. Heat slowly and evenly to the brazing temperature, without local overheating. Use the flux as a temperature guide - it will become clear or opaque as the brazing temperature is approached. If blackening of the flux occurs this is often a sign of insufficient flux, overheating or flux exhaustion.


The flux residues left after completion of the brazing operation are corrosive and should be removed. The residues for Easy-Flo Flux Powder can easily be removed by soaking in hot water ~ 40 °C for between 15 and 30 minutes. Any remaining residues can then be brushed off in running water.


• Supplied in a 250g tub Code


Description C8903 Easi-flo Flux Powder


UOM Price £11.95


250G Price breaks available, see website


See Page 56 1286 COUSINS TRADE SUPPLIER


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