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THE FINE ART OF PUBLICITY


AN INTERVIEW WITH FORMER CAPRICORN RECORDS PUBLICITY MAN MARK PUCCI


by Michael Buffalo Smith During the 1970’s, Capricorn Reecords


in Macon, Georgia became “the” record label for all things Southern, beginning with the Allman Brothers Band, and including bands like Wet Willie, Marshll Tucker. Bunnie Bramlett and many more. There was a whole team in place to create the music and distrib- ute it, but one of the most important parts of the equation involved publicity. Remember, there was no wi-fi, home computers or social networks and no cell phones. The publicity department had to burn up the phone lines, the US Mail and any other means posible to let people around the country and the world know about these great new acts. Such was the job of Mark Pucci for Capricorn. Today he still heads up hi own publicity company, but we wanted to talk a bit about those heady 70’s days publicizing the cream of the Southern Rock crop.


Where were you born and raised? I was born and raised in New Jersey & be- came an instant fan of music from my earliest memories, starting with hearing my oldest brother, Joe , listening to a country radio sta- tion out of New York City. For Christmas, 1956, my two older sisters bought my older brother, Jimmy, & me a 45RPM record player & that’s when I began buying the singles of the day that I liked, many of which I still have.


I got to expand my record collection as


a teenager into buying LPs and going over to New York City to see all the incredible music


Mark, 1974


and shows that were happening over there in the mid-60s at iconic venues in Greenwich Village and elsewhere, like the Café Au-Go- Go, The Scene and Fillmore East.


I understand your career began in 1972 in Memphis. Tell us about your first gig. I actually first began writing about music in 1969 when I was living in Memphis and going to school at what was then Memphis State University. Those years were the heyday of “underground newspapers,” and I starting writing for two local ones: the Memphis Root and Strawberry Fields (which was a print publication for a local record store, The Yel- low Submarine). In October, 1969, I did my first-ever interview for the Memphis Root, which was with B.B. King at the legendary Memphis “chitlin’ circuit” room, The Club


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