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70 SAFETY & SECURITY


and is the specification against which perimeter security equipment is tested as part of the ongoing research to prevent VBIED (Vehicle Born Improvised Explosive Device) attacks. BSi PAS 69 complements this specification by providing guidance on the installation of the tested product.


Who can help


on the Catalogue of Impact Tested products. Although the above list of requirements can be daunting, we are available to discuss all details of any project in more detail and advise accordingly. We would also welcome the opportunity to provide a CPD to any architectural organisation.


International Workshop Agreements: IWA 14.1 & 14.2 The IWA14 specification is now the main standard in the UK that all manufacturers use to test their product developments. IWA 14.1 and 14.2 are new international ISO International Workshop Agreements that combine and update elements from PAS 68, PAS 69, ASTM F 2656 and CWA 16221, as well as new content. • IWA 14-1:2013 is the International Workshop Agreement which specifies the essential impact performance requirement for a VSB and a test method for rating its performance when subjected to a single impact by a test vehicle not driven by a human being.


• IWA 14-2:2013 provides guidance for the selection, installation and use of VSBs and describes the process of producing operational requirements (ORs). It also gives guidance on a design method for assessing the performance of a VSB.


Publicly Available Specification: BSi PAS 68 BSi PAS 68 is the latest Publicly Available Specification from the British Standards Institute (BSi) for vehicle security barriers. It has become the UK’s standard and the security industry’s benchmark for HVM (Hostile Vehicle Mitigation) equipment,


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


When designing the landscape, key importance should be given to the asset of the site and potential threats. For instance, when designing a Public Realm or Crowded Place venue, the threat could be a vehicle as a weapon (VAWs). What speed could a potential hostile vehicle reach on the run up to the site? Could landscaping to avoid a clear run up to the asset help? If the site, or neighbouring site, you are designing is at risk from VBIEDs, the National Counter Terrorism Security Office (NaCTSO) has published Security Advice that can help. Each police force across the UK has a number of Counter Terrorist Security Advisors (CTSAs) which are headed by the NaCTSO (The National Counter Terrorism Security Office). Additionally, the Centre for the Protection of the National Infrastructure can offer further advice.


Conclusion


The correct specification and control philosophy is the basis for a well design system that meets all the site-specific requirements. It is important to install a product that has been tested to the latest specifications and standards recognised by the Government for critical national infrastructure sites, and imperative that the product installed is the impact tested product.


Alongside the impact test specification will be an installation guidance specification, for instance IWA 14 impact tested products installation guidance is IWA14-2, and PAS 68 impact tested products installation guidance is PAS 69. It is very important that a qualified and highly experienced installer, preferably the manufacturer of the product, should install and commission the product so that it meets the IWA14-2/PAS69 specifications. For all automatic equipment it is also imperative that the products are also maintained according to the manufacturers guidance and usage of the product.


Sally Osmond is brand & development manager at Frontier Pitts


ADF AUGUST 2019


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