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17


TRENEZIA, NORWAY WAUGH THISTLETON ARCHITECTS


HONG KONG INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, CHINA LEAD8


Lead8 have been appointed as lead designer for the planned Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) Terminal 1 renovation. Working with Airport Authority Hong Kong, Lead8 will spearhead a collaboration of “internationally renowned” consultants to deliver a “transformative” upgrade to the passenger halls of the 21-year-old aviation hub. Lead8’s design scope includes a total overhaul and upgrade of the 49 boarding gates and adjacent areas of the Level 6 departure concourses. Contemporary seating designs with upgraded charging facilities will provide passengers with “convenient and comfortable waiting experiences.” Lead8 have also “curated a number of new experiential zones that will provide places of entertainment, relaxation, on-the-go work and general down-time spaces for passengers awaiting flights.”


Waugh Thistleton Architects has conceived what they describe as a “visionary project in Norway to create a zero carbon community for all” consisting of 1,500 homes and a cultural hub on Store Lungegårdsvann lake in Bergen. A new boardwalk spanning the lake forms the central spine of the project with a variety of new homes located just behind. Trenezia is “an exemplar of environmental design,” said the architects. With a state of the art


timber construction, CO2 emissions from the construction and during the lifetime of the project will be minimised. The environmentally responsive design, low energy consumption, low water consumption and low waste generation form the pillars of the technical design.


WPP CAMPUS, THE NETHERLANDS BDG ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN


ROW NEW YORK BOATHOUSE, USA FOSTER + PARTNERS


Foster + Partners has revealed the designs for community rowing organisation Row New York’s new boathouse, located in Sherman Creek Park on the Harlem River in New York City. The new Harlem Boathouse recalls this tradition with a simple rectilinear structure made entirely from wood. The new building is fully accessible – a generous plaza sits in front of the building. The lower level contains an expanded storage for boats, which is designed to withstand severe flooding events, while the upper level features a large multi-purpose hall alongside changing rooms and classrooms for after school programmes. The boathouse is shaded by a large folding timber canopy that sails over the structure, cantilevering over the plaza and terrace and providing shelter from the sun.


BDG architecture + design have completed the new Amsterdam campus for WPP. The Rivierstaete building has been transformed from a large traditional office building into a 19,000 m2 “innovative and creative workplace.” The exterior of the building, once dominated by white mosaic tiles, have been largely replaced with floor to ceiling windows. The original concrete structure has been maintained, retaining the character of the building. The roofs, which vary in height, have been transformed into terraces for employees and guests, connecting the inside and outside.The spacious eight metre high reception and lobby area is an impressive arrival, with the striking staircase creating visual and physical connectivity.


ADF AUGUST 2019


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


© Lead8


© Gareth Gardner


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