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NEWS AWARD


RIBA launches International Awards 2020


The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has opened entries for the third edition of the RIBA International Awards, the body’s awards made for architectural projects outside of the UK.


REFURBISHMENT


New life for Hackney almshouses


Tasou Associates, the Islington-based architectural practice, has announced the completion of its latest residential project, the full refurbishment of the Bishop Wood’s Almshouses in Hackney. Working with client Noble House Properties, Tasou Associates has refurbished and restored five historic almshouses on Lower Clapton Road, the heart of one of London’s ancient ‘villages’. The collection of Grade II listed


buildings includes what has been referred to as ‘Britain’s smallest chapel’ dating back to the late 1600s, and the site has been home to Hackney residents for over 400 years.


Guided by a philosophy that “celebrates the special character of the site,” Tasou Associates’ team focused on making as little change to the historic fabric of the buildings as possible. The design “works harmoniously with the attractive redbrick exteriors, high pitch tiled roofs an the Gothic revival windows of the chapel,” said the practice. As part of the restoration, Tasou Associates reinstated chimney stacks, repointed brickwork, and landscaped the central courtyard.


The result is a development of bright, modern one and two-bedroom homes, arranged in their original setting around a shared courtyard. Each new home features an additional bedroom or living space within the loft area, filled with natural light from conservation rooflights. The “fresh” new layout included the addition of a bathroom, kitchen and staircase to each property, whilst the chapel space now features a mezzanine level with a first-floor reception room, overlooked by the stunning 19th century tracery window. The successful renovation means the almshouses, previously identified as vulnerable, have now been removed from the Historic England Heritage at Risk register.


Commenting on the design, Tom


Tasou, director of Tasou Associates, said “We’re proud to have played a role in restoring such a special historic site, which faced an uncertain future.” He added: “The almshouses project is a great example of our ability to sensitively incor- porate modern design techniques whilst respecting the traditional elements of heritage buildings.”


The RIBA International Awards celebrate buildings that “exemplify design innovation, embrace sustainable technologies and deliver meaningful social impact”. Architects across the globe who enter will be considered for three esteemed awards: • RIBA International Awards for Excellence


• RIBA International Prize • RIBA International Emerging Architect Prize


Previous RIBA International Prize winners include Grafton Architects for their university building, UTEC (Universidad de Ingeniería y Tecnología) in Lima, Peru, and Aleph Zero and Rosenbaum, for their new school complex on the edge of the Amazon rainforest in northern Brazil, Children Village. The Grand Jury will be led by


Odile Decq (Founder of Studio Odile Decq), who will be joined by a diverse panel of international and regional experts. The four shortlisted projects for the prize are visited by two expert panels, with the Grand Jury visiting in person before select- ing a winner. The winner will be announced in November 2020. Entries close on 31 October 2019.


To enter or find out more, visit www.architecture.com


© Cristobal Palma, Estudio Palma


5


ADF AUGUST 2019


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


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