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PROJECT REPORT: COMMERCIAL & WORKPLACE ENVIRONMENTS


grants the certificate), the designers needed to raise the bar from BCO requirements when it came to elements such as fresh air supply (achieved using an MVHR system). Reaching Well requirements means 14 litres per second, compared with 12 litres per second for BCO.


A further constraint from the targeting the Well standard was actually a “nice limitation,” says Eaglesham, namely that materials needed to be as natural as possible, and certified. “It makes it harder to find the (natural, durable and sustainable) materials, there’s less available to you, but what there is is very nice.” Mayfair’s “rich past” was used for inspiration, with classic materials such as marble and brass complemented by more modern counterparts like chevron carpet, ash and Douglas fir for flooring and bespoke joinery, and black aluminium for frames to partitions and doors.


Outside


The repainting of the brick facade on Heddon Street (the Regent Street facade is Portland stone) was the only element where the heritage element posed a challenge, reports Jon Eaglesham. “We wanted to take the paint off and restore the brick, but it had deteriorated too much. So we repainted, but it took a very long time to agree the colour.” In the end, a lively red was chosen, contrasting with pale stone window surrounds.


The spacious new terrace, accessed from the fifth floor, creates a “rare outdoor amenity in Mayfair,” say the architects. It required removing the roof slab, extending the mansard roof up by a metre and a half to protect the space, and rebuilding the party wall. Phase 2 of the project, which is about to begin, will see a pavilion created here to add to the planting and furniture, enable more year-round use for work or socialising, so it “becomes an extension of the building rather than just an outdoor space.”


Conclusion


The litmus test of a project like this, in terms of success for its client – located as it is in an expensive part of town – is occupancy, and the rate since completion has been “brilliant,” attests the project architect. The spaces have “a real buzz and vibe,” says Eaglesham, now seeing a wide range of businesses, from one-man startups to bigger firms, flourishing in its relaxed but professional interiors.


As well as winning the Hubble Awards’ ADF AUGUST 2019


27


Health & Wellness Award, the project has been shortlisted in several awards schemes. These are the 2019 BCO Awards (London Region), two categories in the NLA (New London Architecture) Awards – Workplace, and the Wellbeing Prize – and the AJ Retrofit Awards (Office 2000-5000 ft2


category). The


scheme is on the way to receiving its Well Platinum certification, which will confirm it as truly world-class in terms of wellness among coworking offerings.


One Heddon Street certainly represents a big shift for The Crown Estate, which as Eaglesham says, could previously have been seen as “a very traditional landlord client.” He concludes that while this arguably remains true, this project shows they are also “establishing themselves as a leader in providing best in class flexible office space.”


PROJECT FACTFILE


Architects / interior designers: Barr Gazetas Client: The Crown Estate Project manager: Dendy Byrne QS: Burnley Wilson Fish M&E engineers: Mecserve Structural engineer: Waterman Austin Murphy Contractor: BW Well AP: Cundall Net internal floor area: 22,012 ft2 Flexible booths: 13 No. of trees planted: 6 Cycle spaces: 34


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