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Eat Well & Prosper GRUNTS, SLUMPS AND BUCKLES


TM


free-form tarts, filled with honey then baked over hot coals, thou- sands of years ago. Tat tradition was carried on


A


by the ancient Greeks who devel- oped the pie crust to create savory


by Executive Chef Ron Skaar of Redwing, Mn. ~ ronskaar@comcast.net


Bakers to the Pharaohs of Egypt we’re creating rustic


cheese cakes. Oysters, mussels, lampreys plus many other fish and meat varieties were incorpo- rated into the Roman puddings, which were stuffed in pastry. Te pie was developed from the Ro- man idea of sealing meat inside a flour and oil pastry, then baked.


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Cobblers are certainly a varia- tion of that pie. Te first recipe for short paste, to line a tart, was published in 1545. In the 1600’s, settlers to Amer ic a b r o u g h t along their f a v or it e r e ci p es, such as En g li s h s t e ame d pudding. Early colo- nists were so found of these juicy dishes that they were served as the first course, main course and for breakfast. Tey did not find their favorite ingredients in the New World, however, but were good at improvising. Tat is how all these traditional


American recipes came about with such unusual names. Varia- tions of cobblers have been called crisps, buckles, grunts, pan- dowdy, slumps and sonkers, to name a few. By the 19th century, these dishes became primarily desserts. Cobblers are a deep dish dessert with fruit filling, such as peaches, apples or berries, usu- ally covered by a thick biscuit crust. Crisps and crumbles are also baked with the fruit mixture on the bottom but the topping can be made with flour, bread crumbs, nuts or cookie crumbs. Te crumble is the British ver-


sion of the American crisp. Bet- ties, or the Brown Betty, consist of fruit baked between buttered


crumb layers. Tey resembled the English steamed puddings, which were very popular dur- ing colonial times.


Grunts


and Slumps were early attempts to adapt the English pud- ding dessert to the prim- itive cooking equipment available in the colonies.


Tey were cooked on top of the stove. In Maine, Vermont and Rhode Island they were called slump. In Massachusetts it was the grunt, referring to the sound berries make as they stew. Pandowdy is another deep-dish


fruit dessert, usually apples, but sweetened with brown sugar or molasses. Te crumbly biscuit crust is pushed down, during baking, to allow the fruit juices to come thru. Buckles and Crumbles are types


of cake with berries added to bat- ter. Te streusel like topping gives it a crisp buckled or crum- pled appearance. A Sonker is an Appalachian term for a deep-dish pie similar to cobbler containing either strawberry, peach, sweet potato or cherry filling. May 17th is National Cherry


Cobbler day and my niece Kar- rie’s birthday. Tis recipe, with fresh cherries, would make a unique and delicious dessert to celebrate any occasion.


MAY 2019


EW & P Recipe


CHERRY COBBLER


Ingredients: Filling:


6 cups fresh pitted cherries 1 1/4 cup sugar 1/3 cup cornstarch


Topping:


2 cups all-purpose flour 1 cup plus 1 tablespoon sugar 1tablespoon baking powder 1 teaspoon salt 1 cup milk 1 stick (1/2 cup) unsalted butter, melted


1/4 teaspoon nutmeg


Directions: Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Toss the cherries with 1 cup of sugar and let stand for 1 hour. Combine the remaining 1/4 cup sugar with the cornstarch and accumulated cherry juice in a small saucepan. Cook over medium heat un-


til thickened, about 3 minutes. Cool slightly and stir into cher- ries, then pour them into a 9-inch square baking dish. Combine the flour, 1 cup of the


sugar, baking powder and salt. Add milk and melted butter and stir until just smooth. Spoon the topping over the berries, spread- ing to cover evenly. Sprinkle the top with remaining nutmeg and tablespoon of sugar. Bake 45 to 50 minutes. Let cool before serv- ing. Serve with whipped cream, if desired. Makes 8 to 10 servings.


May 26th is National Cherry Dessert Day.


August 28th is National Cherry Turnover Day.


It’s easy to impress me. I don’t need a fancy party to be happy. Just good friends, good food, and good


laughs. I’m happy. I’m satisfied. I’m content. Maria Sharapova


Pg 4 • MAY 2019 • UPBEAT TIMES, INC. I’m successful every day because I look in the mirror, and I’m happy with who I am. ~ Rose Namajunas


Ron Skaar


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