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TECHNICAL


Designed to give the best of both worlds by offering function and beauty, the Gemini surface spray aerator can move over three times as much water than decorative patterns thanks to its open-throat propeller design. Seen here at Old Thorns Golf and Country Club, it has the capability to easily manage aquatic environments for clean, clear, healthy water


asking what a system’s OTR is. Any manufacturer that is serious about helping its customers keep their lake or ponds aquatic ecosystem balanced and clean will happily provide you with OTR test results for its products, performed by an independent third party and tested to the exacting standards set by the American Society of Civil Engineers. It’s the industry’s only comparative benchmark and anyone who tries to hide the results or doesn’t provide them should be avoided.


What works best for your water body?


With expert third party testing, we can also learn valuable lessons about which aerators work best in different types of water bodies, which is why all Otterbine systems have been tested for OTR by the


Model


1HP High Volume 1HP Sunburst 1HP Air Flow 1HP AirFlow IHP Phoenix 1HP Mixer 3rd Party T


Flow Rate 920GPM 530GPM


N/A 4.35 M depth N/A 2.5 M depth 150GPM N/A


esting completed by the University of Minnesota


University of Minnesota or Gerry Shell Environmental Labs. Independent testing has shown that, contrary to popular belief, diffused aeration is not the best solution for everything. In fact, a surface spray aerator is 100 percent efficient in water up to five metres deep, but any deeper and the oxygen may not reach the bottom of the water. For water five metres or deeper, a diffused air system is always the most efficient option.


Following this advice can make a real difference in having a system that works and one that doesn’t stop the damaging effects as a result of oxidative stress. For example, if you use a diffused air system in a lake four metres deep, you lose fifty percent efficiency; so be wary of those selling a ‘one


OTR


3.28lb/hr 2.75/b/hr 2.72lb/hr 1.59lb/hr 1.32lb/hr 0.3lb/hr


fits all’ system, they just don’t! It’s also important to remember that you


can’t over-aerate water. In fact, water’s capacity to hold dissolved oxygen reduces as the temperature rises, so ensuring you always have enough oxygen isn’t the easiest task when dealing with the change in seasons. A rise from 14 degrees to 27, for example, can see the water’s capacity to store dissolved oxygen reduced by 40%, so making sure your aerator is always meeting the dissolved oxygen saturation point is highly important. It’s recommended to aim for around 80% over the saturation point to allow for changes in temperature and other external factors. So, when looking for an aerator system,


make sure the people you deal with know what they’re talking about. The scientific community has developed a tool to help us choose the most effective aeration device and, as such, responsible manufacturers will have third party, independent tests at the ready to share with potential customers. Be sure to ask for a copy when you are in the market for an aerator. With the information from these tests you can be confident that the aerating system you buy will work to help improve and maintain high water quality and deliver the best possible results.


To find out more visit: www.reesinkturfcare.co.uk/partners/otterbine


PC April/May 2019 139


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