search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
TECHNICAL


Worm cast clearing - close up


Air2G2 in use


adjustments could lead to one big jump in the right direction.


The most obvious reason for monitoring and manipulating our pH, is to try and discourage casting worms. It’s well established that worms prefer neutral or slightly alkaline soils and so altering the soil in which they live will hopefully discourage and reduce their activity. We have noticed a reduction in casting activity in the areas where we are attempting to amend our pH, versus some of the ornamental areas we are responsible for where we do not have the budget to carry out such treatments. Of course, this isn’t a complete solution, rather part of a wider process we undertake, but more on that later. Maintaining a lower soil pH also has a number of benefits to the health of the grass plant. For example, there are plenty of research papers relating to soil pH, and prevalence and growth of diseases


such as fusarium. In short, the majority of turf diseases are less prevalent where the soil pH is slightly acidic.


In addition to this, many of the nutrients needed to support healthy turf become unavailable to the grass plant, or are ‘locked up’ at higher pHs, particularly micronutrients (with the exception of molybdenum) which tend to become locked up at pHs above 7.5. A note of caution should be applied here, as it is also possible to lock up nutrients at lower, acidic pHs too. Phosphate is a good example of this; at pHs above 7.5, phosphate ions will combine with calcium and magnesium. Similarly, at lower pHs, phosphate ions will attach to aluminium and iron readily. In both scenarios, the compounds formed by these chemical reactions are not easily taken in by the grass plant. This means that managing pH is essential to ensuring nutrients in the


soil are accessible to grass plants, which will in turn have a direct impact on the health of the sward.


Our target is to get our pH to a value as close to 5.5 as possible. This is of course slightly acidic, which is considered ideal for growing rye grasses, such as those that we use for tennis courts. It also allows for the many additional benefits listed previously, such as discouraging casting worm activity, inhibiting the prevalence of turf diseases, and whilst improving the availability of many nutrients in the soil profile. There will be some that will, correctly point out that, at a pH of 5.5, we may end up locking up a small number of nutrients (such as phosphate, as mentioned above), however we have also then looked at the way in which we feed our courts, particularly through the winter. Another aspect of our winter management plan has involved looking at the way in which we feed our courts through the winter. In previous winters, we’ve combined some granular feeding with the use of liquid foliar feeds; those who have read some of our previous articles will know that, in recent years, we’ve incorporated turf hardeners


Events lawn and Clubhouse - Spring 2019 130 PC April/May 2019


We’ve have had to develop an aeration plan to ensure that, during the wetter months of the year, the courts drain as freely as possible





Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164